Do light of the two trees physically buff elves?

Discussion in '"The Silmarillion"' started by VECT, Dec 30, 2016.

  1. VECT

    VECT New Member

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    At first all the significance of having seen the light of the Two Trees seems metaphorical, that it just allured to the fact that those elves have apprenticed under the Ainur and learned a lot of stuff before the First Age (compared to their brethren who stayed in Middle Earth and played with tree houses).

    But the more I think about it, it seems the light might actually bestow some kind of tangible buff (enhancing people mentally or physically) to the elves that have seen it.

    Biggest example is Elwe/Thingol. This guy technically never apprenticed in Valinor (maybe just learned a thing or two from his wife). But the book seem to make a big deal out of the fact of him just having seen a glimpse of the Two Trees when he went as an ambassador to scout out Valinor.

    Am I miss reading this, or is the buff part kind of implied?
     
  2. OfRhosgobel

    OfRhosgobel Registered User

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    The light of the two trees LITERALLY permanently enhances those that see it. Those who have basked in it's light are forever changed by it..
     

  3. VECT

    VECT New Member

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    Is there any explicit mention of this?
     
  4. HurinThalion

    HurinThalion New Member

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    I don't have my copy of "The Silmarillion" with me, but I seem to remember that in the description of Dagor-nuin-Giliath, right after the Noldor return to Middle Earth, is says that they are so effective at defeating the orcs since the light of Valinor was still in their eyes, or something to that effect.

    The way it's worded makes me think 1) there is some kind of spiritual or physical tangible effect that strengthens an elf who has seen the light of the Trees and 2) this strength fades over time.
     

  5. Phuc Do

    Phuc Do New Member

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    How exactly would the trees enhance them? More muscle-power or more wise like?
     
  6. VECT

    VECT New Member

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    Probably both.

    And if that's the case the importance of the Silmarils is not metaphorical/symbolic anymore. After the death of the Two Trees those jewels are the last source of this buff.
     
  7. Azrubêl

    Azrubêl Drúadan

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    I think both are true, that it is symbolic and actual. Tolkien's world is idealistic, meaning that there is a fluidity between reality and idea. Tolkien uses the classical approach of harmony of form and content in his characters and then makes stories out of those characters.

    So, the more light, the closer to Valinor, etc the more elevated the being is. Like you point out, the value of the Silmarils is not just symbolic, but it's the fact that they also offer a "doorway" into this lost state of perfection.
     
  8. Matthew Bailey

    Matthew Bailey Member

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    Yes, the Light of the Two Trees Physically and Spiritually (Mentally) changed people.

    The "Light" of the Two Trees was different from the light (small-l) from, say, a Candle.

    And within Eä, there were metaphysical properties that existed, otherwise, which would give the "Light" the ability to both physically and mentally/spiritually change people.

    Associated with "Light" within Tolkien's work is "Good" (not just "good," but "Good," with a Capital-G), and "Darkness" with "Evil" (also, not, Capitals).

    This is because within Eä, "Light/Dark," and "Good/Evil" where things that existed as both pure Platonic forms, but also as Physical things you could touch, put in your pocket, make bread out of, or... indeed.... Make a Magic Ring with.

    And those Elves who lived in Aman were exposed to this Light, and thus changed by it, due to something else that is true within Eä: Physiognomy: That the spirit or soul affects the appearance of the body.

    The Light of the Two Trees affected both the Hröa and Fëa of the Elves. It gave them a power that appeared as light (small-l) to others who saw them, and as a Light to those who were perceptive of the Fëa or Spirit.

    This is why the Sindarin were called the "Grey Elves," in fact.... Because Elwë Singollo (and in the earlier accounts, many of his kinsman) had been to Valinor, and been exposed to the Light of the Trees, when they remained in the darkness of Middle-earth, they brought some of that Light with them, but not as fully as those generations who had spent centuries or millennia beneath the Light of the Trees.

    This is an aspect of Middle-earth that Tolkien was really anxious to fully give an account of, but he ultimately failed because he did not have a deep enough understanding of the Hard Sciences to know what was needed for a full Metaphysical Foundation for Arda/Middle-earth. But he did provide enough evidence that one could be discovered by those who did understand the Hard Sciences well enough to be able to tell what must be True about Eä, Arda, and Middle-earth in order for the world to appear as it does, and for the things within it to behave as they do.

    And "Light" behaving differently than "light" happens to be a part of Middle-earth that is very easily explained without the need of metaphor or allegory.

    And that explanation itself fills in other blanks regarding Middle-earth as well, and why certain things happen, why certain characters of beings can do certain things, why certain places seem as they do, or why all of the previous even exist to begin with.


    Most people who study Middle-earth tend to focus upon either the Languages (and their creation, or similarity to Terrestrial Languages), or the Peoples of Middle-earth (and their relationship to our worlds).

    But when you begin as a Scientist, and you discover that Tolkien himself sought to discover a workable, or Operational Metaphysics for Middle-earth.... Then that is where you tend to focus, and it tends to be easier to discover such a Foundation than it is in our world or Universe.

    MB
     
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