Fellowship of the Ring Vs. Harry Potter

Discussion in '"The Fellowship of the Ring"' started by Talimon, Jun 9, 2002.

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Which was a better adaptation, Harry Potter or Fellowship of the Ring?

  1. Harry Potter

    8 vote(s)
    18.6%
  2. Fellowship of the Ring

    35 vote(s)
    81.4%
  1. lightingstrike

    lightingstrike Registered User

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    Well if you like movies from books to stick closely to the book they were made from, the obvious answer is HP. But, I liked FoTR better because it took more risks and came out as an overall better movie. Of course, you could go on and on about all the little things that were put in or taken out, bu t overall, I liked FoTR.
     
  2. Viewman

    Viewman The Blue

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    I like lotr best ofcaurse hehe but i think harry potter is good to :)
    And a lot easyer to read :)
     

  3. Eledhwen

    Eledhwen Cumbrian

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    "No-one pretended that what we were doing was art!"

    Having read Christopher Lee's autobiography, I realised that we have largely forgotten how bad film adaptations of books used to be! Sometimes the only bit that was 'based on the book by ...' was the name and, hopefully, the lifestyle of the protagonist; and the period in which the film was set.

    Compared to past adaptations, both HP and LotR were very faithful. However; I think that, because of the sheer genius of Tolkien's work and the reverence in which it is held, there was a strong hope among purists that the film would rely more on Tolkien's brilliance than Peter Jackson's. As the films went on, Jackson's little additions became more and more obvious until, in the extended edition of the final film, members of the Fellowship were behaving in ways that would have appalled JRRT. There is some consolation that many of these scenes didn't make the cinema cut.

    The directors of Harry Potter are somewhat hampered in the licence they can take with the story, as the author is still alive and could severely dent box office takings if she gave a negative review.