Looking for Tolkien Approved Illustrated Version of LOTR

Discussion in 'Other Related Topics' started by 1stvermont, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. 1stvermont

    1stvermont Member

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    I am looking for a illustrated copy of Lord of the Rings and am leaning towards Alan Lee's version

    http://www.tolkien.co.uk/product/9780007525546/The Lord of the Rings


    I am specifically looking for a version that will present middle earth in a realistic non cartoon/fantasy manner. Tolkien viewed middle earth as real history and did not like the normal fantasy/Disney portrayal of "fantasy" books. So i am also looking for any version by artists he generally approved of. Any ideas or suggestions would help, thanks.
     
  2. Galin

    Galin Registered User

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    I don't think there's an illustrated edition that Tolkien himself approved. If I recall correctly, the artists that he liked in his day never ended up doing an illustrated edition.

    In general, JRRT liked Pauline Baynes -- The Adventures of Tom Bombadil -- but for example, according to John Rateliff Tolkien appears to have generally disliked her interpretation of the Fellowship (the Nine Walkers), which had been included on one of her maps.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018

  3. 1stvermont

    1stvermont Member

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  4. Squint-eyed Southerner

    Squint-eyed Southerner Lurking in the Chetwood

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    I agree on Alan Lee-- suitably grim, with a kind of medieval feel. It reminds me of the person who wrote to Tolkien that he reserved his reading for Lent, "because it was so hard and bitter".

    For a more colorful take, I like Ted Naismith, who's especially good for expansive landscapes.

    Depends on your mood, I guess.
     

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