Origin of Ghân-buri-Ghân's name?

Discussion in 'The Languages of Middle-earth' started by Snap Jagglard, Nov 26, 2016.

  1. Snap Jagglard

    Snap Jagglard New Member

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    Hi everyone, I'm interested in knowing what was Tolkien's inspiration for the language and names of the wild men or woodwoses of Druadan.

    Specifically, I am intrigued by the name Ghân, as it calls to mind "Khan," meaning a chieftain or military leader. Archaically, it's from the nomadic steppe tribes like the Mongols, Manchus, Turkic peoples, and has ancient variations even in Korean. In the archaic Korean, "Han" is synonymous with "Khan" and means "big head man." And in the chapter in Return of the King in which the character Ghân-buri-Ghân first appears, he calls himself "great headman."

    So it is all but obvious to me that "Ghân" is related to this word Khan, but I wonder what Tolkien's reasoning was. Is there any record of Tolkien expounding on the meanings of the names or language of the wild men?
     
  2. Ingolmin

    Ingolmin Member

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    Ghân-buri-Ghân means "Ghân son of Ghân".
    Tolkien had given no information regarding the language of the Drúedain.
    Also, I do not at all think that Ghan was a derivation of the name Khan because Tolkien made his own languages, he did the share the languages of the people of Middle Earth with that of the Earth. Both are different.

    Thank You. I am a young loremaster Ingolmin, heir of Elrond Halfelven and I hope you would gladly take my information.
     

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