Theory on why the Ring has no effect on Bombadil

Discussion in '"The Lord of the Rings"' started by BalrogRingDestroyer, Apr 30, 2018.

  1. BalrogRingDestroyer

    BalrogRingDestroyer Member

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    This is actually a pretty solid theory. If the Ring is to be used to get someone what they wanted, whether just invisibility like in the cases of Smeagol and Bilbo, to gold (in the case of dwarves), to power and strength (in the case of men and perhaps wizards), then, to somebody who was totally content the way they were and without a care in the world, the Ring would have NO effect whatsoever on them.

    Granted, I think the first time Bilbo put the Ring on, he wasn't intending to make himself invisible, so it's not a solid argument that if you don't intend to use the Ring to do something, that it won't still do something to you. However, to be fair, on that one, now that I think of it, Bilbo WAS intending to NOT be found by Gollum, and the Ring obliged. As for Isildur, from what I can tell when he wore the Ring, he was intending NOT to be found by the Orcs (and the Ring obliged for a while, then betrayed him.) Had Bilbo found the Ring and not intended to hide from anyway or be invisible, perhaps it wouldn't have made him invisible.

    Of course, on the other hand, I don't think Frodo was intending to be invisible at The Prancing Pony, but perhaps he'd had too much to drink and in his drunken mode, actually DID intend to disappear as a childish prank.


    Anyway, as Bombadil doesn't seem too bothered that Sauron is on the loose or that he has evil Hourons on one side of his house and Barrow Wights on the other, I'd say he's totally happy the way he is.

    As such, perhaps for that reason, the Ring is useless against him. Ironically, for that reason, it would indeed make him a very poor guardian of it. Either he would get bored of it and toss it away or caring for it enough to destroy it would get him to actually desire something he doesn't have (the destruction of the Ring). Hence, the Ring would try to tempt him to use it to make it easier to get to Mordor so that he could destroy it (which, would, of course, in time, end up backfiring by revealing him to Sauron, which would have been what the Ring really wanted.). Also, for that matter, it's also likely why Galadriel and Glorfindel didn't take the Ring. Even if they had the sense to know that keeping it as a weapon to defeat Sauron, rather than destroying it, was a foolish idea, the Ring could have gotten to them to use their powers to blast through foes in their way to Mordor in their quest to destroy the Ring, which would alert Sauron, who might even end up coming himself to waylay them.

    Anyway, because Bombadil doesn't desire anything from the Ring and is content the way he is, the Ring doesn't affect him. As for how he was able to vanish it, I have no idea.


    BTW, I think even Gandalf confirms my theory when he says "say not that he has power over the Ring, rather, that the Ring has no power over him."
     
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  2. Ron Simpson

    Ron Simpson Member

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    I used to spend alot of time trying to ‘think through’ Tom Bombadil’s (TB) situation until really smart people in this forum provided really good reasons why, maybe, I shouldn’t bother at all.
    If we accept TB as an enigmatic non-actor in the narrative, then our worries are over. But as soon as we attempt to attach any logic to his actions and behaviours, then down the rabbit-hole we go. Here are a few examples of what I mean:

    -Assistance in Wars: Tom helped out in none of them (Wars of Beleriand, War of Wrath, Conflicts with Angmar, The Last Alliance, War of the Ring, Invasion of the Shire (and wasn't Farmer Maggot his friend?) From a logical perspective, this behaviour is at odds with what you'd expect from the 'good guys' in the narrative. It makes no sense given that he had everything to lose had evil won the day
    -Barrow Wights: why would TB allow them to exist in his domain into which he withdrew, and where he had complete mastery? Given that he had the power to freely cast them out, why indulge them?
    -there’s more, but why bother ?

    Isn’t it easier to just read through the 3 TB chapters, then forget him altogether and just keep going?
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2018

  3. Barliman

    Barliman Member

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    I just took him to be totally unconcerned about the wider world. Provided you didn't bother him he wouldn't bother you. If you were friendly, he'd befriend you, when it suited him. Maybe he liked Maggot's mushrooms as much as hobbits did. :)
     
  4. Merroe

    Merroe Active Member

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    ... and maybe there is a second good reason:

    It was a good brew, and Pippin found himself more than compensated for missing the Golden Perch.

    That a guy like Barliman would overlook this fine detail...! :D
     

  5. Squint-eyed Southerner

    Squint-eyed Southerner Lurking in the Chetwood

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    Ah, but did old Tom even drink beer?

    The drink in their drinking-bowls seemed to be clear cold water, yet it went to their hearts like wine and set free their voices. The guests became suddenly aware that they were singing merrily, as if it were more natural than talking.

    Which raises the question: what was in that stuff?! :eek:

    Of course, Tom does quaff a few in "Bombadil Goes Boating", so it appears he wasn't a teetotaler, either.

    Maybe Goldberry disapproved? ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2018
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  6. Celebrimbors bane

    Celebrimbors bane New Member

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    Tolkien pretty much tells us why the ring doesn't have an effect on bombadil, due to pretty much being a pure pacifist, he hinself is a watcher not a doer and I think he accepts things (even evil things ) for what they are, he allows a huorn to reside near him, the witch king at some point rouses the spirits at the barrow downs which no doubt bombadil knew about yet doesn't intervene. He plays no part in the war of the rings because he's not looking for any form of control, hence the ring has nothing to play on with him.
     
  7. Miguel

    Miguel Member

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    A happy hippy?.

     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2018
  8. Aramarien

    Aramarien New Member

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    Frodo asked Goldberry, "Who is Tom Bombidil?" and she answered, "He is." " He is Master of wood, water, and hill....He has no fear..... he is Master." Goldberry says no one has caught him.

    One thing I noticed, is that Tolkien capitalized "Master". No one has control over him.
    There are many theories that Tom may be a Maiar. The Maiar that we do know, like Sauron, Gandalf, Saruman, Radagast and Melion seemed to have personalities, foibles, strengths and weaknesses. They had powers, some like Sauron more powerful.
    Tom is master of wood, water, and hill and was in Middle Earth before even the first acorn. Tom seems to let nature be nature, but things like Old Man Willow, who seems to have become sentient like a Huorn, or even the Barrow Wights that are trying to use their own power for ill purposes, he has power over also.

    I wonder, also, would the Ring make the Istari, or other Maia invisible? Perhaps if they weren't as strong as Sauron. Gandalf was afraid to wield it. He never said that he would become invisible.

    Gandalf probably said it the most simply, " The Ring has no power over him. He is his own master", so that in itself is why Tom did not become invisible when wearing the Ring.
     
  9. Gilgaearel

    Gilgaearel Member

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    The case of Tom Bombadil is quite simple.
    TB was the master of himself. Someone who is master of him/her self can't be controlled by someone or something else and doesn't want to control anyone else not even his environment.
    He doesn't need anything, doesn't miss anyone, can't be obsessed with other persons or objects alike.
    He is what he is, as it is. The/any ring, person, object, situation, environment or whatever can't affect him.

    I think that it would needless to say that TB is one of my favourite characters.
     
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