Was Thorin the antihero of The Hobbit?

Discussion in '"The Hobbit"' started by BalrogRingDestroyer, Feb 20, 2018.

  1. BalrogRingDestroyer

    BalrogRingDestroyer Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2018
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Hobbiton
    He's not a villain, but his gold-lust nearly wrecked everything (though it also may have saved everything as he brought Dain and without Dain, they would have lost the Battle of Five Armies.)
     
  2. Merroe

    Merroe Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2016
    Messages:
    150
    Likes Received:
    104
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Luxembourg
    If by “antihero” you understand the “villain” in the story, I would not agree. Thorin tried to reconquer the kingdom that was his by birth right though not just for himself but for his kin as well.

    But perhaps you may try to start your analysis on the person of Thorin from another angle. “The Hobbit“ was originally written as a book for children (you have undoubtedly noticed the quite different style of storytelling when comparing to LotR, particularly in the first two thirds of the book). Therefore, if it is a book for children, there is a moral message to it. What could children learn from Thorin’s destiny?

    Just as examples (no claim to have noticed all) I personally would retrieve from his ending:

    • Even mighty and wise people are prone to weaknesses and sins. If they repent then much is made good (like Thorin apologizing to Bilbo in his last moments) and he will nonetheless be remembered for the good he’s done (like Bilbo grieving over his death).
    • Excessive pride and stubbornness without thought for other people’s reflexions or opinions lead to isolation and needless problems (like Thorin behaving towards Thranduil and all of them being locked up).

    There is a very strong moral sentence we should all remember which he spoke on his deathbed (gosh, I do like that one!):

    “If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.”

    If you can join me from that angle of perception, then what would you think about his message in this story?
     
    Rána likes this.

Share This Page