Why couldn't they get through the Redhorn Pass?

Discussion in '"The Lord of the Rings"' started by BalrogRingDestroyer, Mar 20, 2018.

  1. BalrogRingDestroyer

    BalrogRingDestroyer Member

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    Gandalf is a freaking wizard. How could he not have gotten them through somehow? And why did Gimili act like the mountain itself hated them?


    Was there some sort of supernatural power like Sauron, Saruman, or even the Balrog blocking their way? Gandalf even made some comment that the malice of Sauron was behind the impassable pass.


    More to the point, why not take the Misty Mountains pass that Bilbo and the Dwarves took? It was right next to Rivendale.
     
  2. Merroe

    Merroe Member

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    It may be a point of debate whether Gandalf would have had weather conditions under his control; the story suggests he had not.

    In the dwarves' past they had met with much misfortune there (and they would soon discover more bad news there); Gimli certainly knew about much of the evil past.

    As for the reason why they weren't taking the closest mountain pass, you might remember that while the Fellowship was waiting to depart from Rivendell scouts were sent out in all directions. From that, they learned the following:

    Even from the Eagles of the Misty Mountains they had learned no fresh news. Nothing had been seen or heard of Gollum; but the wild wolves were still gathering, and were hunting again far up the Great River.

    In setting their course towards Hollin, it was explained as follows, in line with the news they had from the eagles:


    Their purpose was to hold this course west of the Mountains for many miles and days. The country was much rougher and more barren than in the green vale of the Great River in Wilderland on the other side of the range, and their going would be slow; but they hoped in this way to escape the notice of unfriendly eyes. The spies of Sauron had hitherto seldom been seen in this empty country, and the paths were little known except to the people of Rivendell.
     

  3. Celebrimbors bane

    Celebrimbors bane New Member

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    Not to mention the misty mountains were raised by morgoth a power far beyond Gandalf! So if it was the mountain itself playing up probably not much Gandalf could of Done, even if it was sauron doing it he's still more powerful than Gandalf the grey, so really yeah not much old gandy could do.
     
  4. Squint-eyed Southerner

    Squint-eyed Southerner Currently in hiding

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    As often, Tolkien leaves it ambiguous. Such exchanges as this:

    "I wonder if this is not some contrivance of the Enemy" said Boromir. "They say in my land that he can govern the storms in the Mountains of Shadow that stand upon the borders of Mordor. He has strange powers and many allies".
    "His arm has grown long indeed, if he can draw snow down from the north to trouble us here three hundred leagues away", said Gimli.
    "His arm has grown long", said Gandalf.

    And others in a similar vein, could imply that the storm was caused by Sauron, but Gimli cautions against that view, and as Merroe said, he probably knows more about the mountain's history than any of the others, possibly even Gandalf.

    IIRC, Tolkien at one point toyed with the idea that Sauron was directing all the various enemies encountered by Frodo & company, even Old Man Willow, but decided against it.

    And keep in mind that the Istari were messengers, sent to help and encourage the people of Middle Earth, not to work miracles for them. Yes, they had "powers" of a sort -- Gandalf's association with fire makes him a kind of seraph figure -- but they were severely limited in what they could do, by the will of the Valar.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018 at 10:13 PM

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