Why did the Nazgul think stabbing Frodo would give them victory?

Discussion in '"The Lord of the Rings"' started by BalrogRingDestroyer, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. BalrogRingDestroyer

    BalrogRingDestroyer Member

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    I know this seems awful to think about as decent people, but consider what Mordor would have done in the situation of the good guys. Who is to say that after Frodo was stabbed, that they wouldn't just leave him to die and give the Ring to someone stronger like Aragorn? Staying with Frodo would endanger the lot of them, especially if he was won over by the wound and fell to the will of the Enemy.

    One would have thought that Sauron, who was so power hungry that the idea of someone wanting to destroy the Ring rather than use it NEVER occurred to him till Frodo claimed it on Mount Doom and the whole plan of the Council of Elrond was exposed to him, would have assumed that Strider and the three other Hobbits would leave Frodo to die and run with the Ring themselves in hopes of defeating Sauron and using the Ring themselves. That they would run the risk of Frodo falling and all being lost wouldn't seem like something that Mordor would think of.
     
  2. Merroe

    Merroe Active Member

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    Regarding the events on Weathertop, I think it's probably more correct to talk about the attack of the Nazgul (rather than of "Mordor"): they were Sauron's emissaries with the explicit mission of recuperating the Ring and returning it to Mordor.

    As I see it, their plan was not just to stab Frodo but to overrun and kill the whole party as needed to accomplish their mission. Their attack was done, but in not too clever a manner:
    • They relied on their effect of terror at night, but were met with unforeseen courage.
    • They were not expecting resistance. Apart from Aragorn's courage, they were also surprised by his use of fire and by Frodo's resistance with his enchanted sword from the Barrow Downs, specifically forged for combat against the Witch King.
    • So they took the job too lightly: they did not even attack at full strength (some of them were still in pursuit of Gandalf).
    Their attack was not fully in vain because Frodo was becoming visible to them as a result of his wound, but that result was eventually insufficient to make a difference.
     
    Kinofnerdanel likes this.

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