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any names in Tolkien's work starting with J or X? Did he exclude J due to his first initial? Who knows? Or Jesus?

Olorgando

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I'm wondering if it has to do with the fact that west European languages can't agree on how J is to be pronounced. The letter J seems to be a post-Roman addition to the alphabet, to pronounce a sound the Romans didn't have in their alphabet (I don't know about the Greek alphabet and its derivatives, just too unfamiliar with that). A case in point more generally are the Slavic languages that use the Roman alphabet instead of the Cyrillic script, like Polish or Czech. They need all sorts of squiggles on their Cs and Ses to denote sound not found in Germanic- or Roman-derived languages; Turkish, too - which Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, modern Turkey's founder, declared was to be written in Roman script instead of the Arabic used before. Apparently Arabic was even worse in portraying sounds found in the Turkish language that did not exist in Arabic.
For J, there's the leader of the Argonauts from Greek saga (or mythology), Jason. In German, his name is spelled Iason, as it also appears to be in Greek and Roman. English pronunciation of the J seems to be derived from French, though not an exact copy. Or, there's the term jungle, IIRC derived from one of the languages of the Indian subcontinent. Well, to write this in German (derived from the probably-already-corrupted English term) we need to render it "Dschungel". I know all about this J discontinuity, I spent nine years explaining to Americans that my real-world first name, while being spelled with a J, is to be pronounced as if it were Y … 🙄
For X, names in any language starting with that letter seem to be rare. Off the cuff, there's the Persian king Xerxes, but that was Greeks transcribing from another language, something they were not really good at (their term for non-Greek speakers was "barbarian"; talk of snobby!), or Xanthippe, Socrates's wife (whose name has become proverbial for a nagging woman, perhaps specifically wife, in German), and Xaver in German, or perhaps more correctly in Bavarian (and that band leader Xavier Cugat) - oh, and that star of the Spanish national football team of years gone by, Xabi Alonso.
 

Elhath

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The "characteristically modern Indo-Europeanish" initial sound "j" = dʒ which is found in Italian, Modern English etc. is natively absent in most of Tolkien's favorite languages such as Finnish, Greek, Latin and older literary Welsh — which probably explains why his "within-the-world" created names show the same rarity. The sound WAS, however, apparently found in the middle and at the end of certain words in some variants of Old West Germanic, such as in (the reconstructed scholarly pronunciation) of Old English a.k.a. Anglo-Saxon.
 
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Olorgando

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The "characteristically modern Indo-Europeanish" initial sound "j" = dʒ which is found in Italian, Modern English etc. is natively absent in most of Tolkien's favorite languages such as Finnish, Greek, Latin and older literary Welsh — which probably explains why his "within-the-world" created names show the same rarity. The sound WAS, however, apparently found in the middle and at the end of certain words in some variants of Old West Germanic, such as in (the reconstructed scholarly pronunciation) of Old English a.k.a. Anglo-Saxon.
As a native speaker of New High German (as well as New High(?) English), I have not been able, off the cuff, to think of usage of the J in the middle of modern German words. For J used at the end of words, I only have a vague suspicion that this may be limited to the westernmost edge of what can nowadays be considered the Germanic language distribution, aka Dutch / Flemish (originally Germanic "Anglo-Saxon" having been seriously polluted by Norman French after 1066). And as for "Anglo-Saxon" (not the modern Saxon dialects), that is something of a borderline case, more North Germanic - southern Norse, one could say, taking Norse as the ancestor of Norwegian, Icelandic, Swedish and Danish, blending into northern "Low" German - "Niederdeutsch". "Hochdeutsch" or "High" German apparently starting at about the middle, latitude-wise, of modern Germany, the terms strangely, if I have understood this correctly, having much to do with altitude - "Low" German being spoken in the north German lowlands, "High" German in the Middle Mountains starting in about the geographic middle of Germany and continuing into the Alps. Which would make the dialect, almost a separate language bordering on Dutch, "Schwyzerdütsch", or Swiss (non-high) German, a variant of the Alemannic German also understood in parts of south-western Germany, the "Highest" German. Which would make all of my linguistic instincts rebel massively … 😵
 

Starbrow

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One example of /j/ in the middle of words is in names. My maiden name is Tietjen (pronounced Tee-jen) and my ancestors are from northern Germany - Hamburg area, I think. There are still families with the Tietjen name in Germany. BTW, my parents grew up speaking the Plattdeutsch, or Low German, dialect.
 

Olorgando

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One example of /j/ in the middle of words is in names. My maiden name is Tietjen (pronounced Tee-jen) and my ancestors are from northern Germany - Hamburg area, I think. There are still families with the Tietjen name in Germany. BTW, my parents grew up speaking the Plattdeutsch, or Low German, dialect.
Oh yes, and on TV even: Bettina Tietjen (but pronounced Teet-yen), co-host of a monthly talk show from 1997 until it was integrated into another format in 2019, losing its name, which for the longest time had her name in the title - though it was her first name for a couple of years. She continues as co-host of the other format. Appropriately, the shows are produced by the north German affiliate of the federally organized public TV channel 1, the "Norddeutscher Rundfunk" or NDR.

A note of possible interest to philologists is a dialect sound-shift found (at least) in the Berlin dialect: there, the G often mutates to a J (spoken like the Y in German).

There used to be a show on the NDR channel 3 that was "op Platt", or in Plattdeutsch dialect. Can't say I can really follow such conversations. But then, if the dialects get too thick in Bavarian, Franconian, Saxonian, Swabian, Hessian, Rhineland dialect etc. I have the same problems. Another point of possible interest are the Frisian dialects spoken on the Frisian Islands off the North Sea coast. The North Frisian and East Frisian Island belong to Germany, the West Frisian Island to the Netherlands. Supposedly, all Frisians can understand each other, while Germans and Dutch listening in who don't know the dialect are left in incomprehending confusion.
 

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