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Fingolfin's Shame

Maedhros

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From Morgoth's Ring: The Later Quenta Silmarillion (II)
But even as he spoke, suddenly Fëanor appeared, and he strode into the chamber tall and threatening. A fire of anger was in his eyes, and he was fully armed: his high helm upon his head, and at his side a mighty sword. 'So' it is, even as I guessed,' he said: 'my haf-brother would be before me with my father, in this as in all other matters. He would not wait for the council, where all words would be heard by all, and answered. He would speak against me in secret. This I will not brook!' he cried, turning upon Fingolfin. 'Get thee gone, and take thy due place!' Then as a flash of flame he drew his sword. 'Get thee gone and dare my wrath no longer!'
Why didn't Fingolfin wait for the enitre council to gather? Did he felt ashamed for doing this? Is this the reason why Fingolfin forgave his brother and made his promise to follow him, so there would never be dissention among them?
 

Dwimmerlaik

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No,I don't think Fingolfin felt he needed a full council for his views to be heard.His views in any case were not secret,and were sure to be rebuffed by Feanor-though not perhaps in the manner and method Feanor adopted.
Fingolfin was his fathers son,and thus should not have had an unreal expectation that Finwe could and would pull Feanor into line.
The fact that Finwe did not rebuke Feanor for Fingolfin's accusation,nor the drawing of Feanor's sword against Fingolfin,must surely have cemented Fingolfin's feeling of insecurity or the dominance of his father.
I see it as Fingolfin feeling it his duty as a vassal to Feanor(next in line to Finwe)their father,to forgive his brother and to preserve family unity.
Unfortunately later events after Finwe's death proved these oathes to be ruinous for all concerned.For instance;Would the host of elves leaving Valinor been as large if not for the the presence of Fingolfin and his son's?
A dignified Fingolfin forgave Feanor his trespass against him,and furthermore swore fealty to him.Not a craven act of aquisence but one of courage in the hope that unity would provide strength.



Criiiikey!I don't use as many F's as that when I'm swearing.
 

Maedhros

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No,I don't think Fingolfin felt he needed a full council for his views to be heard.His views in any case were not secret,and were sure to be rebuffed by Feanor-though not perhaps in the manner and method Feanor adopted.
Doesn't the other party involved have the right to hear what they are saying about him.
Seems fair enough to me.
 

Gothmog

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Then there was great unrest in Tirion, and Finwë was troubled; and he summoned all his lords to council. But Fingolfin hastened to his halls and stood before him, saying: 'King and father, wilt thou not restrain the pride of our brother, Curufinwë, who is called the Spirit of Fire, all too truly? By what right does he speak for all our people, as if he were King? Thou it was who long ago spoke before the Quendi, bidding them accept the summons of the Valar to Aman. Thou it was that led the Noldor upon the long road through the perils of Middle-earth to the light of Eldamar. If thou dost not now repent of it, two sons at least thou has to honour thy words.'
Chapter 7: Of the Silmarils and the Unrest of the Noldor

Since he was asking their father to restrain the Pride of Curufinwë in an attempt to lessen the trouble within as well as without the family he probably felt that such private matters should have been handled privatly and not in open council. It was in fact Feanor who was destroying not only the peace of Aman but the unity of the house of Finwë. It seems to me that such matters as Fingolfin brought to their Father would be better spoken first in private, not infront of all. If it could not be delt with within the family then it could have been taken before the council.

Indeed, had it been delt with by Feanor's Father then much evil may have been avoided.
 

Maedhros

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Why couldn't at least wait for the arrival of his half-brother then, and then deal with this matter in the family.
 

Gothmog

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I would say that he wanted to be able to put his side to their father. He no doubt had a fairly good idea of how his half-brother would react and only wanted their father to calm him down. He wasn't trying to get Feanor in any way punished nor was he looking for a fight, that was Feanors intent.
 

Confusticated

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I agree with Gothmog as to why Fingolfin did this.

About the shame... I think he might have felt shame, and this may even have had a roll in him forgiving Feanor.

Shame feels bad, and when one feels bad about something they did, they take some of the blame, and when that happens it is easier to understand that others are not flawless, and to forgive them.

I don't feel I know Fingolfin well enough to say if this was the case with him or not. He has never been someone that I have identified with in any way, but I think it's likely enough.

Even if Fingolfin didn't feel some level of treachery or betrayal at what he did, the words of Feanor coud have been enough to do it.
 

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