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Frodo Trying to Give Away the Ring

HLGStrider

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At least twice in the book, Frodo attempts to give away the One Ring to someone he trusts.
The first time was with Gandalf when the Wizard told him the story of the ring. The only other one I can remember was Galadriel's very dramatic temptation.
I think he also sort of offered it to Aragorn at the Council of Elrond, because Aragorn was Isulder's heir.

Why does he do this? Would Frodo truly be able to give away something with such a strong hold on him? Does it show that Frodo is purer and less greedy than those who go before, or just more trusting?

It obviously shows the strength of those who turn it down and lets them admit their weakness in being unable to conquer it. Any comments?
 

Beleg Strongbow

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Originally posted by HLGStrider
At least twice in the book, Frodo attempts to give away the One Ring to someone he trusts.
The first time was with Gandalf when the Wizard told him the story of the ring. The only other one I can remember was Galadriel's very dramatic temptation.
I think he also sort of offered it to Aragorn at the Council of Elrond, because Aragorn was Isulder's heir.

Why does he do this? Would Frodo truly be able to give away something with such a strong hold on him? Does it show that Frodo is purer and less greedy than those who go before, or just more trusting?

It obviously shows the strength of those who turn it down and lets them admit their weakness in being unable to conquer it. Any comments?


I think he might have been offering cause he was scared that they would take it by force. Also gandalf said that he couldn''t force bilbo to give it to him as it would brake his mind. UI think that he wouldn't have been able 2 give it 2 them in mordor. But he might have been able 2 at lothlorien in the shire. As for aragorn i think he just offered cause he thought it belonged to him. He was pretty tough and had a strong will but wouldn't it have been easyier for someone with a less strong will since the ring would have less power with on them. Bilbo gave the ring away and he had it a lot longer and used it more then frodo did. But i think cause of galadriel's and gandalf's majesty he would have given it up IF he thought they would do something good with it for M.E. Remember Boromir...
 
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Harad

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I agree with you. And think it was 3 times. It shows that even up to Lorien, Frodo has not succumbed to the Ring Addiction. However, he doesnt actually give it away so it unclear whether he REALLY would have been able to. By the time he reaches Cirith Ungol, not too much later, he IS hooked.

In part his resistance is due to his heroic nature, but he really hasnt used the Ring too much before Lorien. Bombadil, Bree, Weathertop..that's about it.
 
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Harad

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I had a warm discussion of this with Bill the Pony on the movie forum. To answer you: no, certainly not in the book. In the movie I think when he meets Aragorn after escaping Boromir near Amon Hen, he is momentarily wary of ANYBODY. However he soon realizes there is a big difference between the 2 men and trusts Aragorn completely.
 

HLGStrider

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I can imagine what a "Warm" conversation means with you, Harad... :rolleyes:

I remember him being afraid that the ring would tear the Fellowship appart... That's a whole nother... That a whole nother? That a whole other? Doesn't sound right... Oh well, that's another discussion.

His offers to Galadriel and Gandalf were totally open. I think they should a certain guileless, trusting quality that was stronger than guile or suspicion. The victory of innocence over all else, if you would...
 
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Harad

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Warm=friendly. I am sure thats what you meant.

BtP thought the movie was illogical:

What I did not understand is that Frodo first says he does not trust Aragorn. (he says something like stay away, you're not going to be able to resist it either). And then he just keeps standing there giving Aragorn every chance to take the ring away from him.

If he did not trust Aragorn as he says, then he should have slipped the ring on again and disappeared. If he did trust Aragorn (as he should), then he should not have said: stay away.
I dont think there is any problem here because Frodo knew both from experience (Bree, Weathertop, Caradhras, Parth Galen) that Aragorn was very different from Boromir. Frodo's initial problem is quite understandable: he had just escaped from Boromir and Sauron, both lusting after the Ring.
 

Eonwe

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Originally posted by Harad
In part his resistance is due to his heroic nature, but he really hasnt used the Ring too much before Lorien. Bombadil, Bree, Weathertop..that's about it.
ohmygod you said "used" the Ring... :)
 

Quercus

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I think that Frodo offered the ring to Gandalf because he had just been informed that he was in possesion of the most evil thing in Middle Earth and the dark lord was on to him. He was terrified and wanted nothing to do with it. Also, he trusted Gandalf to do the right thing with it, and at that point, I think that he would have given the ring to Gandalf with little hesitation. If Gandalf would have accepted it it would have been a quick fix for Frodo.

When Frodo offers the ring to Galadriel he knows that she already posesses one of the three elven rings, and I think that he's hoping that she would be willing to take on the responsibility of his ring too. Yes, I think he would have given her the ring. Why? Again because he's scared. Not just for his own safety. Altough I'm sure that by this time he's had quite enough adventures. But the person that he trusted the most to get him through this, Gandalf, is gone. Frodo feels like he's on his own and he's never really believed that he was an adequate candidate to carry out such a task. He told Gandalf that he felt he was lacking in the wits, heart and strength that one would need. (Sort of like the Scarecrow, Tin Man and Cowardly Lion all rolled into one!)

I think that's part of the reason why Frodo managed to fight the will of the ring as long as he did, he was totally unpretencious. He had no desire to try and wield the ring - he knew he couldn't.

As for whether or not Frodo would have entrusted the ring with Aragorn. I think that Frodo trusted Aragorn but I'm not sure how easy it would have been for Frodo to turn the ring over to him.

As for the movie - I think that they are so busy showing how wise Aragorn is for resisting the ring that they betray the fact that Aragorn would never have 'let Frodo go'(as he says in the movie) into Mordor all by himself. And I don't belive that Frodo would have ever left if he'd had known that his friends were in danger.
 
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Harad

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Aragorn would never have 'let Frodo go'(as he says in the movie) into Mordor all by himself.
Aragorn does this very thing in the book. When he lets Frodo go in the movie he does so by throwing himself in the path of a gazillion orcs.
 

Tar-Palantir

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Obviously, the longer Frodo had the Ring and the closer he got to Mordor, the harder it would have been for him to give it up. But I wonder how easy it would have been for him to turn it over even as early as "Shadow of the Past". He got a little freaky when Gandalf threw it in the fire, remember.
Also, I never fully bought Galadriel's implication that Frodo was "revenged" and was consciously "testing" her when he offered Galadriel the Ring. First of all, I don't think Frodo was deep enough to do that. Plus, it's out of character. I read it more as Galadriel doing that to herself. She obviously had thought a lot about the One Ring and what she'd be able to do with it if she had it. Even though Gandalf had his "do not tempt me" speech, I think the lure of the Ring was much greater for Galadriel. Her desire for power is written all over her history.
As for Aragorn, I can think of no statement or thought by him that he would ever consider taking the Ring. Additionally, I don't consider Frodo's "then it's yours" statement at the Council to be an offer.
 

Dhôn-Buri-Dhôn

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We also see from the case of Bilbo that it's a good deal easier to offer, or even to intend, to give the ring away than it is to actually give it away.

I think that at least some of the "offers" were more like wishful thinking than genuine attempts to transfer the ring. At the CoE, Frodo sees an opportunity to rid himself of his terrible burden by "returning the ring to its rightful owner" (a misconception, as Aragorn and Gandalf quickly point out).

However, if it had come to actually handing over the ring to someone - anyone - it would be another matter entirely. Consider the encounter with Bilbo in Rivendell. Frodo loved Bilbo more than anyone in ME, but even allowing him to see the ring was a struggle, and Bilbo's attempt to touch it had monstrous effects.

The fact is, Frodo didn't have the Ring, the Ring had him. His rational mind may very well have wanted to pass it on, but I doubt he would have been able to do it, when push came to shove.
 

Snaga

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Donnie I think that's spot on. Remember when Gandalf asks him to throw it into the fire at Bag End? He can't do it. I don't believe he would have gone through with it.

Just as a matter of interest: he toys with the idea of giving the ring away only when in the presence of one of the Three. Coincidence?
 

HLGStrider

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Interesting... Never thought of that...

Do you think that the three attract the one or is it that they have a sort of purifying presence, that makes him want to give it away?

Or is it just a big coincidence, considering that he wasn't offering the ring to Elrond or Gandalf, the second time... If you can call that an offer.
 

Quercus

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Harad

OK you're right - I guess Aragorn did let Frodo go. I just never really thought of it that way. I stand corrected.
 
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Mellon

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This thought about the One being offered in the presence of the Three is intriguing, but I would humbly suggest this is coincidental. After all, Narya was present with Gandalf for much of the trilogy.

We could also look at this issue not in terms of "offering", but with regard to the several times that the Ring was turned down by those who knew what it was and had opportunity to take it. This adds the strong and good figures of Tom Bombadil, Faramir, and Elrond. Not to mention Samwise (the Strong!).

I think that Tolkien was trying to teach us something about character, and its importance in keeping material possessions from controlling us...



(How's that for my first posting with your group :cool: ? -- "Friend"
 
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Son of Elrond

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Frodo was chosen because....

Frodo was the purest of heart and the one hobbit that Gandalf knew could resist the temptation of the ring longer than anyone. When he saw how Bilbo had reacted to seeing the "funny magic ring" again, he knew the power the ring could have over him if he let it. He realized he was carrying the weight of the future of middle earth, and the longer the journey lasted, the heavier, literally, the ring became. When the time came that Samwise should carry it after the spider's attack, again, Gandalf had chosen wisely, with Aragorn concurring when the time came, for this companion of Frodo proved to be the sturdiest and truest of friends possible. The turning point of the journey, inside the walls of Mordor, takes its toll on both of them.
When you think about the simplistic childlike nature of the Hobbits, it makes you think of the OT prophet Isaiah who said.... "And a child shall lead them...."
 

Snaga

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Welcome Son of Elrond, Welcome Mellon!

I think Frodo offering the ring whilst in the presence of the 3 is coincidence: although perhaps in their presence Frodo feels safer.

Son of Elrond: I think you are right about Frodo's character, but Gandalf was fortunate that Bilbo chose a suitable heir. Of course Bilbo's judgement was generally better than you might expect, so this is not a surprise. But he might have decided to leave all to Pippin: how well would he have measured up? I don't think that Gandalf had many choices: he couldn't have got Bilbo to pass the ring on to anyone other than his chosen heir. Bilbo found it hard to give it up at all.
 

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