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Just finished Fellowship...

Belthil

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What part did you like most?
In the book the sequence at Crickhollow takes up a much greater part than in the movie, I liked the Crickhollow part, for me the thrill of hiding there made me look eagerly for the rest of the journey! :)
 

Squint-eyed Southerner

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Crickhollow was in the movie? Guess I'd forgotten about that.

Tolkien was greatly exercised in the sequence, which underwent many revisions. In one of them, the proto-Frodo was actually captured by the Nazgul. The author, in attempting to eliminate one character, nearly ended up with two of him!

This entire episode has been criticized, even by those sympathetic to Tolkien, as unnecessary to the story, but aside from its intrinsic value as insight into the development of the characters of the hobbits -- particularly the Frodo-Sam relationship -- it sets up the attack sequence in "A Knife in the Dark". This is important, for symbolic and structural reasons, not just for that chapter, with the two parallel Nazgul attacks, but for the greater story.

I may have mentioned this before, but the attack on Crickhollow closely parallels the assault on the gates of Minas Tirith. If we examine it closely, we find the same elements: the pre-dawn darkness; the drawn sword (gleaming with "a chill light" in one, "flames" in the other); the repeated blows; the words of command; the cock-crow; the echoing horns; the retreat of the Nazgul. The scene is greatly expanded, and given mythical significance, in ROTK of course, something we see Tolkien doing again and again over the course of the story. The Crickhollow sequence is in keeping with the low-mimetic mode of most of Book I; the assault on the Gates, especially in the Angelic/Demonic confrontation between Gandalf and the Witch-King, is on the edge of the mythical mode.

The parallels between the two scenes, and the doubling of symbols into the mythic, make me feel that "foreshadowing" would be too feeble a concept; I think, for the Crickhollow sequence, I'd use something like "template".
 

Olorgando

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No it was not, so it took up no part at all... o_O why they left it out puzzles me.
I agree on your analogies!
That's right, the movie goes straight from the Hobbits escaping the Black Riders by using the Bucklebury ferry to cross the Brandywine River to Buckland to their arriving at the west gate of Bree.
PJ felt that the Crickhollow, Tom Bombadil and Barrow Wight stuff just held up the story - and I can't critisize him here, for once.
 

Squint-eyed Southerner

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Those were important to the structure of the story -- particularly the barrowdowns, given the coming significance of Merry's sword.

PJ eliminated a lot of things; judging from the final product, apparently to allow time for extra FIGHTS! "Oh, boy -- another BIG FIGHT! Yay!"

I was initially dissapointed, but on reflection, decided that, given what he did to some of my favorite setpieces, the more he left out, the better. No telling what he would have turned TB or the Barrow-wight into.

I was reminded of a review of Georges Perec's lipogram novel, in which he left out all words containing the letter "E": "It was all right, but would have been better if he'd left out all the other letters as well".
 

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