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languages....

Hama

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I am not sure, but 13 does sound about right. If you really want to know, find a copy of the Atlas of Middle Earth, it has a geographical distribution of all the languages of Middle Earth. I counted: dwarwish, quenya, adunaic (nemenorean), sindarin, westron, dunlending, rohirrim, the black tongue, orcish, druedain,[that's ten] (and what about the languages spoken by easterlings, variags, and haradrim?) I am sorry that I don't have the Atlas on me, but if anyone does, please, please check it up. I am sure they have it. By the way, there are definitely different dialects spoken as well. Such as beorning (Related to rohirrim) and the three groups of hobbits had their own language before they adopted westron. adunaic is the mixture of quenya and the tongues of man so I don't know if it would count as its own language.
 

Beleg Strongbow

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Originally posted by Hama
I am not sure, but 13 does sound about right. If you really want to know, find a copy of the Atlas of Middle Earth, it has a geographical distribution of all the languages of Middle Earth. I counted: dwarwish, quenya, adunaic (nemenorean), sindarin, westron, dunlending, rohirrim, the black tongue, orcish, druedain,[that's ten] (and what about the languages spoken by easterlings, variags, and haradrim?) I am sorry that I don't have the Atlas on me, but if anyone does, please, please check it up. I am sure they have it. By the way, there are definitely different dialects spoken as well. Such as beorning (Related to rohirrim) and the three groups of hobbits had their own language before they adopted westron. adunaic is the mixture of quenya and the tongues of man so I don't know if it would count as its own language.


Yes there is quite a few i'm sorry but i don't have it either also you have the languages spoken by all the animals and horses remember gandalf understanded wolfish, eaglesish and others i'm sure.
 

Eldanor

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You should count the language variations. There are many orcish languages, an some orcs had to use the westron to understand other orcs. There are also some different elvish languages, like Quenya, Sidarin, Noldorin, Telerin, the avari languages... There are also many human languages that men used before having contact with the eldar... and don't forget the language of the ents!
 

Hama

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Thank you, completely forgot Entish. But you credited the Eldar with too many tongues. As far as I know, there is only Quenya and Sindarin and possibly a slight variant on the latter that is the language of Silvan Elves. The Sindar are Teleri, and the Noldor spoke Quenya.
 

Eldanor

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With the teleri I meant the people of Olwë in Alqualondë, and they do have a different language, because of their long separation from the other elves in Tol Eressëa (I think it's said on the Sil). I made a mistake with Quenya and Noldorin (sorry:D ) but remember that the Valar had their own language (Valarin?) and maybe also the Vanyar. The silvan tongues are different from Sindarin: remember that Frodo noticed in Lorien that there were some elves there that spoke a language he didn't understand, and Frodo knew some Sindarin...
 

Grond

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Originally posted by Eldanor
With the teleri I meant the people of Olwë in Alqualondë, and they do have a different language, because of their long separation from the other elves in Tol Eressëa (I think it's said on the Sil). I made a mistake with Quenya and Noldorin (sorry:D ) but remember that the Valar had their own language (Valarin?) and maybe also the Vanyar. The silvan tongues are different from Sindarin: remember that Frodo noticed in Lorien that there were some elves there that spoke a language he didn't understand, and Frodo knew some Sindarin...
If I remember correctly, the Valar had no spoken language since they required none. They spoke Quenya when necessary so as to be understood by the Eldar but they spoke a tongueless language to one another, speaking with their minds.

I could be wrong, as I haven't looked this up... but it is what I remember and usually my memory is pretty good. :)
 

Eldanor

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sorry, I'm not sure (like you), but I think I have read somewhere that they had another language, a Valarin, which they probably used with the Vanyar; I think it was in one of those sites about elvish languages (like http://www.elvish.org/gwaith , I'm not saying I'm sure it's said on this page, but...) Maybe I'm wrong, I couldn't give you precise information.
 

Grond

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I have yet to get the energy level up to research the matter myself, but this site http://www.uib.no/people/hnohf/ tells me that there is a language of the Valar. Here is what it says on the matter.

In Aman, Quenya was spoken not only by the Vanyar and the Noldor, but also by the Valar: "The Valar appear quickly to have adopted Quenya" after the arrival of the Elves, and their own tongue, Valarin, was not often heard by the Eldar: "Indeed it is said that often the Valar and Maiar might be heard speaking Quenya among themselves" (WJ:305). Pengolodh the sage of Gondolin notes: "In the histories the Valar are always presented as speaking Quenya in all circumstances. But this cannot proceed from translation by the Eldar, few of which knew Valarin. The translation must have been made by the Valar or Maiar themselves. Indeed those histories or legends that deal with times before the awakening of the Quendi, or with the uttermost past, or with things that the Eldar could not have known, must have been presented from the first in Quenya by the Valar or the Maiar when they instructed the Eldar." He mentions the Ainulindalë as an example: "It must...have been from the first presented to us not only in the words of Quenya, but also according to our modes of thought." Indeed even Melkor learnt Quenya, and learnt it well. "Alas," Pengolodh notes, "in Valinor Melkor used the Quenya with such mastery that all the Eldar were amazed, for his use could not be bettered, scarce equalled even, by the poets and the loremasters." (VT39:27)

I still don't remember this language and will get on with looking into tomorrow after I have my Elevenses meal. :)
 

Cian

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Originally posted by Eldanor
The silvan tongues are different from Sindarin: remember that Frodo noticed in Lorien that there were some elves there that spoke a language he didn't understand, and Frodo knew some Sindarin...
In Lórien Frodo was hearing Sindarin spoken with an 'accent'. "This 'accent' and his own limited acquaintance with Sindarin misled Frodo (as is pointed out in The Thain's Book by a commentator of Gondor)." RotK App. F

Tolkien's ideas about "Valarin" changed over the years, but it would seem that Valarin as minimally respresented in Quendi & Eldar is the generally accepted version.
 

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