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Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Maeglin

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Just saw the movie, and I must say I was quite impressed. The acting was not great, but much better than I expected from 4 young (2 very young) people. The Witch was played wonderfully, the battle at the end was quite good, and Tumnus the Faun was excellent, but a little bit creepy. The soundtrack was absolutely incredible, I would suggest getting it. Anyway....I have a lot of studying to do for finals so I'm not going to post an entire review, but I thought it was very well done and look forward to the next movies in the series. If you haven't seen it yet, go now and watch, its definitely worth the price of the movie ticket! :)

Edit: it just so happens that there's also a snowstorm going on here right now, so it made a rather fitting atmosphere for seeing the movie.

And just a random little pondering that I never really thought about when reading the books.....what happens to the people of Narnia when the children leave?! I mean think about it, the Kings and Queens go off hunting and then never come back again! How do the poor citizens of Narnia react?!
 

e.Blackstar

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That's a good question...hmm.:cool:

I'm hoping to see the movie tomorrow, if I can. My humble review will be up as soon as I can type it. :eek:
 

Corvis

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I just saw the film and was very pleased. It stayed true to the book almost entirely (no major changes but a few minor ones which didn't bother me that much). The children's acting was really good (I thought they were better than the kids in Harry Potter) and the music was fantastic. I suggest everyone to go and see it. It's action-filled, funny, and has dramatic parts as well. A great adaptation by Andrew Adamson.
 

Wolfshead

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Corvis said:
The children's acting was really good (I thought they were better than the kids in Harry Potter)
That's hardly difficult - my pet cat could act better than them :rolleyes: ;)

I'm not going to get to see it till after Christmas because my sister wants to see it, so I'll have to leave off seeing it till our post-Christmas shopping trip to Inverness (an hour away) where the cinema is. Here in Aberdeen I can just walk 15 minutes into town at see it :rolleyes:
 

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Well, I saw it today. I'd give it a generous 7 or a low 8 out of 10, which is positively glowing coming from me. Very enjoyable. I thought that the beginning was a tiny bit rushed (up to the arriving at the Stone Table really) and the acting wasn't all it could be. I consider the kid from Terminator 2 one of the only decent child actors so I'm quite a harsh judge. Lucy was possibly the cutest thing since the baby Ewok in Star Wars and Edmond was very good. A few moments of dialogue bothered me where 'freedom' seemed to be the ultimate aim rather than Aslan's rule and I don't know why the wolves were American. The CGI was iffy in a spot or two - namely the train yard at the beginning was a rather obvious model and Tumnus' close up and medium shots didn't match brilliantly. Better than the BBC's Tumnus in his woolly trousers though. All in all very enjoyable. I can't wait for the others in the series.
 

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I just got back from seeing this movie. The CON were my favorite books as a child and I've read them at least twice in adulthood so I was eager to see the movie.

As with LOTR the scenery was stunning (not very coincidental seeing as it was filmed in New Zealand :) ). Special effects were very good. The talking animals and mythological characters were done very well.

I thought the acting was pretty good. Of the 4 children Lucy and Edmund were by far the best. The witch put on a good show as well.

I think it helped to be a true affectionado of the books but my kids (who haven't read the books) were glued to it as well so it passed the test as a movie. The battle scene was good. I also liked the fact that it was very true to the book. Just goes to show that you can keep to the book and still have a decent movie without fabrication and drastic changes. ;)

However when you compare to the LOTR movies, particularly Fellowship (my favorite of the trilogy and IMO the one which best captured the spirit of the books) it falls short. IMO the music in LOTR was much better. But in general The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe was better than average and beyond what I expected. I sincerely hope that it does well at the box office and they continue on with the rest of the books. I would love to see The Horse and His Boy and The Magician's Nephew on the silver screen. :)
 
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e.Blackstar

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The officially Blackstar-sanctioned review, as copied from my livejournal:

First of all, I would like to say with the most sincere appreciation that the film followed the book very closely; near the beginning, almost verbatim, and closer to the end, there were still no major plot changes. The bit with the river was odd, and few scenes were cut and inserted much later or earlier than they ought, but on the whole nothing was added and nothing of significance was cut.
As far as the acting goes: the child actors were very good, for children, and their sibling interaction was believeable. I must say, too, that they were ten times better than those in Harry Potter. (Though they had much better dialogue to play with in LLW…) Of note: wasn’t Lucy supposed to have golden curls? *can’t remember* Also, Ed appeared to be on crack in a few scenes…he’s a kid, though, in a major movie, so I forgive him his faults. The man who played Tumnus, James McAvoy, was beautiful, both physically and insofar as I am capable of evaluating acting ability. ;) However, near the beginning especially, the way he was acting seemed a bit too pedophile-y. *shudders* Anyway…the woman who was chosen as Jadis was gorgeous, and cold, but not quite evil. Creepy, sure, and mean certainly, but she lacked a certain power-lust that would have made her perfect. That said: she was darn good, and better, I think, than Nicole Kidman would have been. The choice for Aslan’s voice was Liam Neeson, which at first struck me as horrible (partly because no matter how hard I try, I cannot disassociate him with Qui-Gon Jinn). As the movie progressed, though, it became like riding a horse: hard to cope with at first, but once you’ve got the rhythm, it actually kind of works. Nevertheless, I would have preferred someone with a deeper and more powerful resonance.

Some other notes:
+Firstly: I was appalled that the Powers that Be changed Fenris Ulf's name to Morgrim (or some such nonsense). Fenris Ulf was a wonderful name with a hint of menace...methinks that 'Morgrim' was added to make it seem more fantasy-y. (Not that it needed it.)
+The costumes, in general, were lovely. *sighs dreamily and wishes she had all that stuff in her costume closet* Rich, semi-period, and just foreign enough. I especially liked the tweaked fleur-de-lis. The Witch’s dresses were odd, though: the one that she wore at the Stone Table was gorgeous, but all of her dresses were stiff, which especially looked unnatural around the bodice. Her general blue gown was a nice colour, but looked as though it had been carefully constructed of dryer lint. On the other hand, her battle helmet completely made up for it.
+When Peter first drew his sword, it was clear that he had had zero archaic weapons experience. He must be a fast learner though, because he was Superman by the time the battle rolled around. *rolls her eyes*
+CGI was nice, I guess. The centaurs were beautiful, the fauns convincing, and the animals…merely decent. Pah.
+Being able to turn things into stone would be amazingly awesome.
+I loved the hunting scene at the end.
+The music at Stone Table was absolutely tremendous…the rest was merely mediocre.
+The ending was clearly setting up for a sequel. I wonder which it’ll be: Prince Caspian, or The Horse’s Boy minus the Pevensies? The other books wouldn’t be made, I’m pretty sure, because they all contain new characters. (Eustace Scrubb…*laughs*)
+I’m eternally grateful that the allegory was no more played up in t he movie than it was in the book. It existed, which it had to, but that was all, so goody.
+Scenery was lovely. Filmed in New Zealand, I believe. However, a few of the sets (including Jadis's palace) were not at all as I imagined. Pew.
+Peter’s battle cry was AWFUL. "For Narnia! And for Aslan!" It was of course made ten times worse by the fact that it was in a pre-pubescent boy voice.
+The fast-forward scene during the battle was weird. Ineffective, and I hated it. Made me motion sick. ;)
+The wardrobe looked far too magical from the very start. Ridiculous.
+[bitter]Cheap laughs are not cool. Rrr.[/bitter]
+My sister said that she didn’t like the beginning, with the air raids. I rather enjoyed it, or at least saw its necessity, but now that I think about it, it left a giant hole. What happened to the Mother? Did the Pevensies ever get back to London, and when? Was their house destroyed? Was their father killed in the war? Did he ever come back? Need closure, we do.

Rating out of 10: 7.75
Maria Rating: Great, but not fantastic. Better when viewed as a whole movie, as opposed to minced-up bits. Go see it; go see it NOW.

And that's that. :cool:
 

Narsil

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e.Blackstar said:
Of note: wasn’t Lucy supposed to have golden curls? *can’t remember*
Yes, she was supposed to be blonde. I chalked it up to choice of actress. She was an adorable little girl, despite the darker hair.

Anyway…the woman who was chosen as Jadis was gorgeous, and cold, but not quite evil. Creepy, sure, and mean certainly, but she lacked a certain power-lust that would have made her perfect.
I agree. She did a good job but I felt she lacked a certain power or force. I think you nailed it. When I think of the White Witch in the books she's very arrogant and has a powerful, intimidating presence. I didn't get that from her in this movie, although she was better during the battle.

The choice for Aslan’s voice was Liam Neeson, which at first struck me as horrible (partly because no matter how hard I try, I cannot disassociate him with Qui-Gon Jinn). As the movie progressed, though, it became like riding a horse: hard to cope with at first, but once you’ve got the rhythm, it actually kind of works. Nevertheless, I would have preferred someone with a deeper and more powerful resonance.
If he wasn't so overdone (as in being the voice of a dragon) I would've loved to have seen Sean Connery. In the movie he came off as Sean Connery-Lite.

+Firstly: I was appalled that the Powers that Be changed Fenris Ulf's name to Morgrim (or some such nonsense). Fenris Ulf was a wonderful name with a hint of menace...methinks that 'Morgrim' was added to make it seem more fantasy-y. (Not that it needed it.)
Not sure where you are located or what edition book you have but in later, American editions the wolf-captain of the secret police is indeed "Maugrim". Don't blame the movie producer, it was done by some publisher. I don't know why. I agree with you that "Fenris Ulf" is better and that was the name I recall from when I first read CON 30 years ago.

+CGI was nice, I guess. The centaurs were beautiful, the fauns convincing, and the animals…merely decent. Pah.
The beavers were a bit stiff but I liked the wolves.

+The music at Stone Table was absolutely tremendous…the rest was merely mediocre.
I agree. I remember thinking that the music in LOTR really added to the movie but was nothing special in LWW.

+The ending was clearly setting up for a sequel. I wonder which it’ll be: Prince Caspian, or The Horse’s Boy minus the Pevensies? The other books wouldn’t be made, I’m pretty sure, because they all contain new characters. (Eustace Scrubb…*laughs*)
Why would The Horse and His boy not have the Pevensies? :confused: I guess all those kids would a bit older...

Eustace Scrubb does get introduced gradually. Out with Peter and Susan and in with Eustace and his buddy Jill.

+Scenery was lovely. Filmed in New Zealand, I believe. However, a few of the sets (including Jadis's palace) were not at all as I imagined. Pew.
I thought her palace would be much more intimidating. A guess I was looking for an ice version of Barad-dur. Yes, it was filmed in New Zealand.

+Peter’s battle cry was AWFUL. "For Narnia! And for Aslan!" It was of course made ten times worse by the fact that it was in a pre-pubescent boy voice.
It was a far cry from "Forth Eorlingas!":D ;)
 

e.Blackstar

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Not sure where you are located or what edition book you have but in later, American editions the wolf-captain of the secret police is indeed "Maugrim". Don't blame the movie producer, it was done by some publisher. I don't know why. I agree with you that "Fenris Ulf" is better and that was the name I recall from when I first read CON 30 years ago.
:eek: :eek: :eek: :mad: :mad: :mad:
I'm devastated! WHY would they do that? And was it done with Lewis's consent? DISGUSTING. :mad:
(I live in Yankville, but I have an elderly edition, so it hasn't been tainted. ;) )

The beavers were a bit stiff but I liked the wolves.
Yeah, the wolves were pretty good. Still a bit doctored though. All the other animals were okay.
Why would The Horse and His boy not have the Pevensies? I guess all those kids would a bit older...
No, but I mean...it would come in in the middle of the reign. Interrupt LLW? I doubt they would do that. :eek:
 

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I'm a happy person. I'll give it an eight. It was beautiful but not breathtaking, and I was hoping to lose my breath frequently.

I am going to blame this on the music. I don't know why the music fell so far short, but it did. If you remade the movie with a better score it would have gotten at least a nine.

It was probably the most faithful book to movie conversion I have ever seen, however, which is good, great, wonderful.
 

Hammersmith

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Narsil said:
Yes, she was supposed to be blonde. I chalked it up to choice of actress. She was an adorable little girl, despite the darker hair.
Stranegly enough, Pauline Baynes' illustrations show Lucy as dark haired, as did the BBC. Evidently Mr Lewis was in the minority! :eek:

Narsil said:
When I think of the White Witch in the books she's very arrogant and has a powerful, intimidating presence. I didn't get that from her in this movie, although she was better during the battle.
The actor who played Jadis played Gabriel in Constantine. I got a very evil vibe from her, but that's maybe because I equated her with a demon? Barbara Kellerman's Jadis in the BBC did little except shout which got old quickly, but I think she could have shouted some lines in this one. The "Aslan, you have A TRAITOR THERE!" still gives me chills in the Beeb version.

Narsil said:
Not sure where you are located or what edition book you have but in later, American editions the wolf-captain of the secret police is indeed "Maugrim". Don't blame the movie producer, it was done by some publisher. I don't know why. I agree with you that "Fenris Ulf" is better and that was the name I recall from when I first read CON 30 years ago.
Aye, my books all had Maugrim in them. I wonder how the change came about?

Narsil said:
Why would The Horse and His boy not have the Pevensies? :confused: I guess all those kids would a bit older...

Eustace Scrubb does get introduced gradually. Out with Peter and Susan and in with Eustace and his buddy Jill.
All four Pevensies are back in Prince Caspian, Eustace replaces Peter and Su in Dawn Treader, Jill replaces Ed and Lucy in Silver Chair. They're all back in The Last Battle. In The Horse And His Boy though, all four Pevensies are adults and Susan's even getting married. I can see them holding off on that one until last, or filming it simultaneous to another film.

Narsil said:
I thought her palace would be much more intimidating. A guess I was looking for an ice version of Barad-dur. Yes, it was filmed in New Zealand.
Wasn't part of it filmed in England?

Anyway, all I can say (after saying an awful lot twice) is that Edmund did marvellously, and he's got some undeserved flack.
 

Niirewen

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I'd give it about a 7.5-ish. It was definately worth seeing, but like Elgee said, not particularly breathtaking. I thought the music was alright and the scenery was amazing. The little actress who played Lucy did a great job; I thought Edmund did well also. I wasn't really pleased with the characters of Peter and (especially) Susan; they didn't seem very similar to how I had always imagined them from the book. The White Witch wasn't great, but still acceptable. The movie followed the book more than I expected, which was great, but I thought the whole scene with the river and the waterfall was kind of weird. For the most part, though, it was really very good.
 

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I never liked Susan, so I felt it was purposefully reasonable not to like her actress. . .

Half way through the movie my sister Robin leaned over and said maliciously, "Peter is cuter than Strider. . ."

I told her Peter was cuter than Viggo Mortensen, but no one is as cute as Strider. . .I also told her Peter was too young for even her.
 

Narsil

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Hammersmith said:
Stranegly enough, Pauline Baynes' illustrations show Lucy as dark haired, as did the BBC. Evidently Mr Lewis was in the minority! :eek:
I'm not surprised at the changes but Mr Lewis himself said at the end of the LWW "But as for Lucy, she was always gay and golden haired."


Aye, my books all had Maugrim in them. I wonder how the change came about?
I don't really know. I think it was dealt with in a thread on this forum. I guess I could do a search and see if I can find it. Seems that the later, American versions changed the name. I do recall noting the change myself when I bought the boxed set a few years ago and read them again as an adult. I'll bet Lewis wasn't alive when it was changed. When I first read the CON about 30 years ago (I was 12) the order of the books was different and Maugrim was definitely Fenris Ulf. As to why they did I haven't a clue. :confused:


All four Pevensies are back in Prince Caspian, Eustace replaces Peter and Su in Dawn Treader, Jill replaces Ed and Lucy in Silver Chair. They're all back in The Last Battle. In The Horse And His Boy though, all four Pevensies are adults and Susan's even getting married. I can see them holding off on that one until last, or filming it simultaneous to another film.
I didn't get the impression that in The Horse and His Boy that the four Pevensies were all grown up yet. For some reason I'm thinking that they are only a few years older, which would work perfectly as a sequel. The audiences have already been introduced to them so why not go with it? It's a great story.

I guess you could make them adults and use the actors and actresses that were in the very last scene of LWW. To be honest, I'll be amazed if they film all the Chronicles, especially The Last Battle. I never liked that book.


Wasn't part of it filmed in England?
That first part of the movie sure did look like England but the Narnia scenes was definitely New Zealand.
 

e.Blackstar

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I didn't get the impression that in The Horse and His Boy that the four Pevensies were all grown up yet. For some reason I'm thinking that they are only a few years older, which would work perfectly as a sequel. The audiences have already been introduced to them so why not go with it? It's a great story.
You have point, but I'm just thinking that it would be confusing. Seeing as the story opens in the middle of the reign, when in the last movie we've just seen the Pevensies go home...:eek: you see?

...The Last Battle. I never liked that book.
:eek: How can you say such a thing!? I loved it! :p
 

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Narsil said:
I'm not surprised at the changes but Mr Lewis himself said at the end of the LWW "But as for Lucy, she was always gay and golden haired."
That I know. But I would have thought he approved Ms Baynes' illustrations?

Narsil said:
I didn't get the impression that in The Horse and His Boy that the four Pevensies were all grown up yet. For some reason I'm thinking that they are only a few years older, which would work perfectly as a sequel. The audiences have already been introduced to them so why not go with it? It's a great story.
No. They're definitely adults. Susan is considering marriage to Rabadash, Peter is warring with giants, they are described as "lords and ladies", clearer physical description (I don't have the books with me) in both THAHB and PC clearly prove that these events take place when they're adults. End of story. Closed case.[/quote]
Narsil said:
The Last Battle. I never liked that book.
What!? To echo Blackstar, that's like, one of the BEST! Maybe one of the most religiously oriented, but one of the best! The only contender to top it would be The Horse And His Boy or The Magician's Nephew. You sir, are certifiable!
 

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Hammersmith said:
No. They're definitely adults. Susan is considering marriage to Rabadash, Peter is warring with giants, they are described as "lords and ladies", clearer physical description (I don't have the books with me) in both THAHB and PC clearly prove that these events take place when they're adults. End of story. Closed case.
Well, I'll concede that in THAHB they probably are older. What you say makes perfect sense. Perhaps they were almost as old in THAHB as when they go back through the wardrobe into their own world? But in PC aren't they back to being children? When Trumpkin meets up with them he says that while they're fond of children they were expecting great warriors so it seems that the Pevensies reverted back to their original ages when they went back to their world.

What!? To echo Blackstar, that's like, one of the BEST! Maybe one of the most religiously oriented, but one of the best! The only contender to top it would be The Horse And His Boy or The Magician's Nephew. You sir, are certifiable!
"Certifiable?" LOL! Nah, just my personal opinion. :D

My favorite stories are indeed The Horse and His boy and The Magician's Nephew but I find the first part The Last Battle to be rather depressing. The whole thing with the ape, the donkey, the Calormenes invading, knowing it's the end of Narnia, the whole thing with the Narnians losing faith, etc. It does get better near the end, although it's rather confusing. Maybe I need to give it another shot, it's been a few years since I've read it. Heck, I love The Silmarillion and that's not exactly cheery either. ;)
 

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Narsil said:
Well, I'll concede that in THAHB they probably are older. What you say makes perfect sense. Perhaps they were almost as old in THAHB as when they go back through the wardrobe into their own world? But in PC aren't they back to being children? When Trumpkin meets up with them he says that while they're fond of children they were expecting great warriors so it seems that the Pevensies reverted back to their original ages when they went back to their world.
Oh, they did revert of course. Remember, no matter how long one spends in Narnia, you will return to our world as if nothing has happened.

Narsil said:
"Certifiable?" LOL! Nah, just my personal opinion. :D

My favorite stories are indeed The Horse and His boy and The Magician's Nephew but I find the first part The Last Battle to be rather depressing. The whole thing with the ape, the donkey, the Calormenes invading, knowing it's the end of Narnia, the whole thing with the Narnians losing faith, etc. It does get better near the end, although it's rather confusing. Maybe I need to give it another shot, it's been a few years since I've read it. Heck, I love The Silmarillion and that's not exactly cheery either. ;)
Well, it's not intended to be cheery. It's an allegory of Armageddon, with all the deception, false teaching, murder, treachery and death that such a topic implies. The fact that Lewis can turn such a subject so ably into a children's book reflects upon his brilliance as an author.
 

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Hammersmith said:
Well, it's not intended to be cheery. It's an allegory of Armageddon, with all the deception, false teaching, murder, treachery and death that such a topic implies. The fact that Lewis can turn such a subject so ably into a children's book reflects upon his brilliance as an author.
After I read your last post I pulled The Last Battle out and reread it. It's a quick read and you're right, with the right attitude I found myself enjoying it. It's a good book and very well done.
 

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Narsil said:
After I read your last post I pulled The Last Battle out and reread it. It's a quick read and you're right, with the right attitude I found myself enjoying it. It's a good book and very well done.
Good for you Padawan! One more in our nefarious clutches, Hammy! :D
 

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