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Lotr or Narnia

Which book is beter lord of the rings or Narnia


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Eebounnie

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Welcome to the forum Edmund !

I did really enjoy Narnia but I must admit that I do prefer LOTR.
 

Phil Lewis

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I could never get into Narnia, I’m afraid I don’t like it at all.

I’m sure it deserves its reputation as an all-time classic, but it leaves me cold :(
 

Olorgando

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LoTR, it simply trumps everything for me.
I have not read Narnia, actually, but instead C.S. Lewis's "Cosmic Trilogy": "Out of the Silent Planet" (1938), "Perelandra" (1943) and "That Hideous Strength" (1945).
 

Erestor Arcamen

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Did you like the Cosmic Trilogy? It's been on my list for a while.

I've read some but not all of the Narnia books (though I own them all). They're very good but definitely, in my opinion, written for a younger audience to understand and grasp than LOTR and its universe (other than the Hobbit maybe) is. I do intend to read them all at some point. Currently I'm on a Brandon Sanderson kick. His Cosmere universe is huge and he's an excellent writer. Can't recommend him enough for fantasy fans.
 

Olorgando

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Did you like the Cosmic Trilogy? It's been on my list for a while.
Going by one highly personal criterium, have I re-read the books, then they were OK, but didn't blow me away. That in contrast to books by Arthur C. Clarke (the Space Odyssey quadrilogy mainly), or the two “crime series in the Middle Ages” by Paul Harding (Paul C. Doherty) as far as they were translated into German, one centering on “Hugh Corbett” in the early 1300s late in the reign of Edward I of England, the other on “Brother Athelstan” and “Sir John Cranston” starting just about with the death of Edward III in 1377. Or the books of Douglas Adams, mostly the “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”. I just realized that that does it for my fiction reading besides JRRT for several decades … just too much good and interesting non-fiction stuff coming out in that time, too.

I own a single-volume 1990 edition by Pan Books and The Bodley Head, the original publisher.
"Out of the Silent Planet" runs 144 pages, “Perelandra” 200 pages, and "That Hideous Strength" 399 pages, so the last book is longer than the first two combined. And even though OSP and P are five years apart, while P and THS only two, the first two are far more alike than the third (Perelandra may have been finished earlier, but publishing put back due to war restrictions). The central character of the first two is Elwin Ransom, philologist and Oxford Don, bearing some traits of JRRT (as he himself said, “I find some of my views Lewisified”). In the third volume, Ransom has become a background figure directing the actions against the baddies, there is a good dollop of Arthurian legendarium mixed in (Merlin is re-awakened from his mound, Ransom is the true heir and Pendragon of Uther and Arthur), with a smattering of Second Age Middle earth (which Lewis had heard read to him by JRRT, parts of the then still unpublished Silmarillion) plus Greek / Roman mythology; each of our solar system’s planets has a vague Valar equivalent modelled on the planets themselves and their Roman deities. JRRT thought that THS was strongly influenced by the writings of the third major Inkling, Charles Williams (btw, Humphrey Carpenter’s quasi-biography “The Inklings” is highly recommendable). JRRT thought the book good enough by itself, but having very little to do with the first two.

What has put me off reading especially THS again is that it contains a lot of stuff about intrigues etc. that gets my “Dallas ‘n’ Dynasty” rash itching. That’s my shorthand for the fact as I see it that almost everything that has been done in movies and TV since the “original sin” of letting those two abominations out of their rightful niche of the classical soap opera slot into prime time has been a blasted clone of them. Hollywood’s cookie cutter got seriously more dreary for me.

Don’t know if any of this highly personal and perhaps idiosyncratic babbling of mine is any help to your decision-making.
 

Erestor Arcamen

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Going by one highly personal criterium, have I re-read the books, then they were OK, but didn't blow me away. That in contrast to books by Arthur C. Clarke (the Space Odyssey quadrilogy mainly), or the two “crime series in the Middle Ages” by Paul Harding (Paul C. Doherty) as far as they were translated into German, one centering on “Hugh Corbett” in the early 1300s late in the reign of Edward I of England, the other on “Brother Athelstan” and “Sir John Cranston” starting just about with the death of Edward III in 1377. Or the books of Douglas Adams, mostly the “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”. I just realized that that does it for my fiction reading besides JRRT for several decades … just too much good and interesting non-fiction stuff coming out in that time, too.

I own a single-volume 1990 edition by Pan Books and The Bodley Head, the original publisher.
"Out of the Silent Planet" runs 144 pages, “Perelandra” 200 pages, and "That Hideous Strength" 399 pages, so the last book is longer than the first two combined. And even though OSP and P are five years apart, while P and THS only two, the first two are far more alike than the third (Perelandra may have been finished earlier, but publishing put back due to war restrictions). The central character of the first two is Elwin Ransom, philologist and Oxford Don, bearing some traits of JRRT (as he himself said, “I find some of my views Lewisified”). In the third volume, Ransom has become a background figure directing the actions against the baddies, there is a good dollop of Arthurian legendarium mixed in (Merlin is re-awakened from his mound, Ransom is the true heir and Pendragon of Uther and Arthur), with a smattering of Second Age Middle earth (which Lewis had heard read to him by JRRT, parts of the then still unpublished Silmarillion) plus Greek / Roman mythology; each of our solar system’s planets has a vague Valar equivalent modelled on the planets themselves and their Roman deities. JRRT thought that THS was strongly influenced by the writings of the third major Inkling, Charles Williams (btw, Humphrey Carpenter’s quasi-biography “The Inklings” is highly recommendable). JRRT thought the book good enough by itself, but having very little to do with the first two.

What has put me off reading especially THS again is that it contains a lot of stuff about intrigues etc. that gets my “Dallas ‘n’ Dynasty” rash itching. That’s my shorthand for the fact as I see it that almost everything that has been done in movies and TV since the “original sin” of letting those two abominations out of their rightful niche of the classical soap opera slot into prime time has been a blasted clone of them. Hollywood’s cookie cutter got seriously more dreary for me.

Don’t know if any of this highly personal and perhaps idiosyncratic babbling of mine is any help to your decision-making.
I really appreciate your opinion and perspectives :). I've had the Space trilogy on my list for a while but have never tried reading it. I've read a few of Arthur C. Clarke's books, including 2001 but I haven't read the rest of that series. I also have read some other old sci-fi like recently I found this book at a used book sale and thought I'd try reading it. It was good but nothing spellbinding though. I just love to read and sci-fi/fantasy is probably my favorite genre.

Sorry if I missed something but what was THS?
edit: NVM my fault for not reading as thoroughly as I thought I did 😅
 

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