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Question on the Ring

apan14

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newbie question

Hi all, this is my first post. I just saw the movie and I've never read the books. I have a question regarding the ring and I've read the FAQs about LOTR out there but could not find the answer. Anyways my question is...

What is the significance about process of the transfer of the ring. By that I mean that why does a individual have to officially transfer ownership to another person to make the possession legit(ie Bilbo to Frodo)? Throughout the movie I see examples of characters saying something to the effect of you have to "offer" the ring to me or equally like Gandalf said "you cannot offer the ring to me" Another instance is when Frodo was talking to Galadriel and she says "of course. you are freely offering the ring to me" etc etc

it just stuck out in my mind about why the ring couldn't be freely past on to others or taken other than the fact that whoever touched would be possessed or corrupted by it. If I just answered my own question or there is any other information behind it please help. THanks!
 

Rosie Cotton

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The ring doesn't need to be offered to make the possession legitimate. Gollum never offered the ring to Bilbo, and yet the ring was definately Bilbo's for quite a long time. Also remember that Sauron never offered the ring to Isuldur, he got it by cutting off Sauron's ring finger. Actually, the books say that Bilbo was the only being that ever gave up the ring of his own free will. Although Frodo offers the ring to both Ganalf and Galadriel, there's a good chance that he wouldn't have been able to go through with it if they had excepted.

I hope that helped. If it didn't, or you have any more questions feel free to ask.

Oh... and read the book, the movie was good, but that's because it's based on one of the best books ever written. :D
 

Valinorean

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Also, I believe Galadriel's concern was this:

if she took the ring by force and used it, it would OBVIOUSLY be wrong.

BUT, if it was OFFERED to her, it was a gray area. She was therefore tempted to accept the offer and try to use the ring for good.

I think if the ring was taken by force and used, the user's actions would more quickly turn to evil. And unless the bearer of the ring willingly parted with it, it would continue to consume them - they would never recover.
 

Gothmog

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What is so important about Frodo offering the ring to Gandalf and Galadriel is that the One Ring causes whoever has possession of it to want to keep it and to stop anyone else from having it. It is a type of self-protection built into it by it's maker Sauron. The only one to give it away was Bilbo, and he only managed to do so with a great deal of help from Gandalf. Frodo offered it to two people, what would have happened if either had accepted is something we will never know as both were too wise to take such a perilous gift.
 

apan14

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thanks!!! that's good enough answer for me. I guess the characters would want to "justify" their possesion of the ring "it was freely given to me~" I guess it's a grey area answer sort of like "where did you find that TV? -... if fell off the back of a truck"
 

Old Man Willow

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I would like to add one thing,


The ringbearer actually does not decide the rings fate, though it may seem. The ring itself has strong control over its destination. Its purpose is to always get back to its maker, Sauron. Transition of the ring is not the bearer's doing it is the ring's. Each transition is a 'path', if you will, chosen by the ring to become found again, in his evil hands.

However, on Isildur's smoting of the ring off of Sauron's finger, this theory of the ring does not hold true (because it leaves its maker). In any case, it is clear that the ring itself is a factor in its own destination.
 

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