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The Flame Imperishable as being analogous to Holy Spirit

Pat

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As is well known, Tolkien was a Roman Catholic. In Catholicism (as well as in other denominations) God is viewed threefold, being composed of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. While the two former have clear purposes, the latter does not. It is in my view that Eru, being the supreme deity of Arda and Eä used the secret fire in a way Tolkien saw the Holy Spirit as. The secret fire is what gives living beings autonomy and is the source of all souls. In the Catholic view all souls originate with God as well, so it is my view that the secret fire is Middle Earth's reflection of the Holy Spirit. Please take what I said with a grain of salt, but I believe it is an interesting comparison. If anyone else has a different view I would love to hear it.
 

Belthil

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As is well known, Tolkien was a Roman Catholic. In Catholicism (as well as in other denominations) God is viewed threefold, being composed of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. While the two former have clear purposes, the latter does not. It is in my view that Eru, being the supreme deity of Arda and Eä used the secret fire in a way Tolkien saw the Holy Spirit as. The secret fire is what gives living beings autonomy and is the source of all souls. In the Catholic view all souls originate with God as well, so it is my view that the secret fire is Middle Earth's reflection of the Holy Spirit. Please take what I said with a grain of salt, but I believe it is an interesting comparison. If anyone else has a different view I would love to hear it.
I think you're not far off, but for me, being a Reformed Protestant, I can not relate to Catholic dogma etc.. As for use of the Holy Trinity I think Tolkien was not consciously aware of putting all of that into his stories. I see no Father, Son and Holy Spirit in these. Other values like respect, love etc. are there all the way long :)
 

Miguel

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I believe the flame is the primal power to create worlds and independent life out of nothing, though the Ainur were instrumental in conceiving of Eä.
 

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