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The Lost Road

Elfarmari

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I just finished reading The Lost Road, and am wondering how it would have ended, had Tolkien not abandoned it. Has anyone ever attempted to finish it? Despite the fact that I am not a great writer, I would like to attempt an end. However, I have not been able to figure out who Herendil is, in relation to Tolkien's other writings. If Elendil is the Elendil who came to ME, then is Herendil Isildur or Anarion (sp)? If anyone has any ideas about his, please post!
 

Elfarmari

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Has anyone else here read 'The Lost Road'? I don't mean the whole HoME book, just the shorter story the book derives its title from. Any comments? suggestions?
 

Cian

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Though obvious to say, it might be stamped again at least that The Lost Road is an abandoned narrative. One of the 'projection' notes mentioned has Herendil betraying plans laid by the "anti-Saurians", but 'on condition that Elendil is spared' -- well that's something there :) But all I could really do is point to Christopher Tolkien's guess, CT explains certain projections, and adds:
"My guess is that all this had been rejected when the actual narrative was written, and that the words of Herendil that conclude it show that my father had then in mind some quite distinct solution, in which Elendil and his son remained united in the face of whatever events overtook them."
For fuller context on the continuation notes see LR of course. Have you read Sauron Defeated? If not I rec. it for more N. related material.
Cheers
 
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Afalstein

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I think the narrative suggests that the son betrays the father to save him, and then the two are forced to go along with Sauron's invasion fleet. At some point the father makes a decision (to save the son, or something), and then he remembers that he's the Oxford professor. That's supposed to mean that the original Father and Son perished.

Lost Road has a lot in common with Notion club from "Sauron Defeated". In that one, it's suggested that at least one of them survived, and came floating unconscious to England.
 

Voronwen

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I love the Numenorean part of The Lost Road. It gives us yet another, deeper and more personal look into the description of the land and it's beauty, its people and their lives, their characters, and what they hold so dear.... etc..... Lovely. :eek:
 

Aldanil

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"Who Is Herendil?" Was Asked

This is almost certainly not quite what you were inquiring about originally, Elfarmari, but I think the truest and deepest/simplest answer to the question is John Ronald's kindred spirit, Christopher. The bond between father and son that lies at the heart not only of The Lost Road but of The Notion Club Papers also took many forms: Elendil and Herendil, Oswin and Alboin, Edwin and Alwin, Alboin and Audoin. The scholar and his most gifted child even appear as almost themselves, very minor characters in NCP, "grumpy old bear" Professor Rashbold and his younger kinsman, John Jethro, who attends the Club's meetings but never speaks. In both of these unfinished tales [now there's a good idea for a book-title] of travels in dream-time, it is the son who is the more powerful dreamer.

When our dearly beloved Author encountered (to his own surprise) the Oldest of Ents on a hillside in Fangorn Forest, the next person to hear the news was Christopher, who was companion and "first reader" on the long and arduous journey from Tol Brandir to Cirith Ungol. We later readers all owe much indeed to Tolkien's youngest boy, whose great love, long editorial labors (and world's-best talent at deciphering his father's longhand) gave us The Silmarillion, the twelve-volume word-hoard of The History of Middle-earth, and The Children of Hurin, to name but three of the presents he has both wrapped up and "unpacked" for our pleasure. So very much of what we know of Arda and its Sub-creation has been brought to light by his devoted custodianship!

It is for grateful praise of the son that I've wrenched your question out of its original context, Elfarmari, but such an abduction shouldn't obscure the joyous and historic occasion: today John Ronald Reuel Tolkien turns one hundred and twenty! Happy Birthday, Dad!
 

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