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Thranduil Meets His Match

Galin

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Pace pronounces síla more correctly than Stephen.

Just sayin'.
 
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Olorgando

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As a German native speaker, let me make one thing perfectly clear (ouch! I'm channeling Richard Nixon!):
ä, ö and ü are regular umlauts. The Scandinavian languages do other strange things with their vowels (Turkish has quite a few umlauts, too).
But (MS character map to the rescue) "ë" looks like an extraterrestrial in any German sentence.
 

Galin

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Aule does not need a diaeresis. SeS probably wanted one here to indicate that the final e isn't silent, considering the topic was about pronunciation.

(it's not really an umlaut in the sense of changing the sound of the vowel)
 

Olorgando

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Aule does not need a diaeresis. SeS probably wanted one here to indicate that the final e isn't silent, considering the topic was about pronunciation.

(it's not really an umlaut in the sense of changing the sound of the vowel)
Correct. I thought Tolkien used one, but I appear to be mistaken.
Quick check in my copy of the Sil: clearly Aulë, and even in capitals AULË in the chapter title of chapter 2 of the Quenta Silmarillion.

I don't recall having ever seen ë or Ë anywhere except in JRRT's writings. In which language is this special letter used?
Is ë analog to é or è or ê in French?
 

Squint-eyed Southerner

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IIRC he said he used it to indicate that the letter was to be pronounced. Final E is usually silent in modern English. He also used it to show where two vowels were to be pronounced separately, rather than as as a diphthong.

Hmm. So it appears I was right after all.
 

Galin

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Correct. I thought Tolkien used one, but I appear to be mistaken.
What I mean is that the diaeresis is not needed 'cause Aule sounds the same as Aulë. And there is no "diaeresis" in the Elvish writing systems.
With a word like síla however, it is proper to include the acute accent to mark the long vowel.

Of course, the pronunciation is "altered" if one doesn't pronounce final -e, so that's why I thought you wanted it above. Tolkien used the diaeresis often enough, as we know (Eärendil, Aulë), but not wholly consistently.

In any case I think it helps some readers, and confuses others.
 

Galin

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I don't recall having ever seen ë or Ë anywhere except in JRRT's writings. In which language is this special letter used? Is ë analog to é or è or ê in French
In Tolkien's orthography the diaeresis marks a vowel "unsilent" (like final e in Aule), or marks vowels in "hiatus", like in the word coöperate.

So you don't say cooperate . . . unless talking to chickens while trying to cut out a syllable ;)
 
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