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Was Boromir Trustworthy?

Aredhel

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I want forum members honest opinion on this. Was Boromir trustworthy, or should anyone have trusted him(Elrond)? In my opinion, Boromir was trusting(don't forget brave). He may have had a lust for the Ring itself, but think of what he did to protect Merry and Pippin when Aragorn wasn't there. He also helped them in Moria, when they were under attack.
 
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Greymantle

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I think Boromir is a great character, often grossly misunderstood. He is noble, kind, and valiant. However, his pride and love for his home prove his downfall-- it is these sorts of emotions that the Ring most easily preys on.
 

LadyEowyn

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Re: Ignore the first one.

Originally posted by Aredhel
I want forum members honest opinion on this. Was Boromir trustworthy, or should anyone have trusted him(Elrond)? In my opinion, Boromir was trusting(don't forget brave). He may have had a lust for the Ring itself, but think of what he did to protect Merry and Pippin when Aragorn wasn't there. He also helped them in Moria, when they were under attack.
I have to admitt, I didn't like him at first, but he proved to be a great guy at the end. And I think he died honorably.
 

Courtney

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I think Boromir was trustworthy, and that the only reason he wanted the ring was that he thought it could help him save his people, which is very noble.
 

Grond

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Courtney has the correct answer.

Many people fail to identify with Boromir and forget that he was "the heir to Denethor". In other words, he was the heir to the throne of Gondor. Of course, he would just be a steward and have a small throne below the real one but he would still rule in the name of the King.

With that role came tremendously responsibility. Boromir already realized the futility of waging war on Sauron. With his resources, it was inevitable that Mordor would overcome. I think Boromir was satisfied with Aragorn's claim but doubted that he had any real strength other than his sword. So.... Boromir hoped that he could possess the Ruling Ring and overcome the evil of Mordor and rule Gondor as King. Goodly and tolerant, wise and just. Only, he never understood the overwhelming evil that the possessor of the Ring would encounter and be devoured by.

At least that's the way I see it.... but I am a hammer and hammer's have no brains at all!!:D
 
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R

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I think he had a desire for the Ring, which imediately made him even MORE influenced by it's seduction. Tom Bombadil didn't want it, and it had NO effect on him...and Galadriel had no desire for it...we all see how little it influenced HER. Gandalf, were he possessed of the Ring, would have been hellaciously powerfull and could have done a great deal. I should hunt down the quote from the Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien in which he writes about what probably would have happened if Mithrandir had the Ring, but I digress...Gandalf showed no sign of wanting for the Ring and so never felt it's draw.

Poor old Bilbo, upon meeting up with Frodo after the adventure, asked where "his" Ring was. It had been a possession that he cherished, and so it had great influence over him. Boromir desired it...even though he may have for good reasons, it made him act wrongly in a moment of weakness, it's seduction working hard at his mind and heart. It would be all too easy, in a story written by another author in which two dimentional characters who you never really care about, to hate Boromir, but because Tolkien breathed so much complexity and life into these "people" one who reads about Boromir with an open mind and heart would be hard pressed to dislike him greatly...That's my opinion anyways. *Shrug*
 

Lantarion

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At another thread somebody asked the question "Do You Think Boromir Was Evil?", and I would answer 'no', because he was brave, strong-willed, noble, humorous and helpful. But he was too obsessed with the glorious future of Gondor, and that is ehy the Ring had such an effect on him: his mind was totally open for the Ring's corrupting influence.
I wouldn't say he was trustworthy, though. He was too suspicious, paranoid and cynical for that.
 

Walter

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So, is it all that noble wanting to save "the own people" and sacrifying the rest of the world for it?

I would also like to throw in that Frodo felt forced to leave the fellowship mainly due to Boromirs attempt to get hold of the ring.

To me Boromir appears as one who couldn't control his urge for power.
 

Grond

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Walter, your statement makes Boromir seem insidious and evil. He was neither if those things. He was prideful and more than anything wanted his father to be King and for himself to appear Kingly. He didn't realize that it is one's heart which detemines that and not one's appearance or actions. His main motivation for stealing the Ring was the deliverance of Minis Tirith. He would then be viewed as its saviour and I'm sure he felt his father would then get to finally be declared King and not Steward. That would make him next in line for the throne.

I think this behavior illustrates how little Numenorean blood Boromir possessed. It is apparent that Faramir got the Lion's share of the Numenorean blood. It's easy to compare, both had the ring almost in their grasp and one tried to take it by force and yet, the other brother aided it on its way to Mordor.

Having said all that, I truly pity Boromir. As many who try to act against evil, they end up performing an evil act in the name of righteousness. That's doens't make them evil, it just makes them act in an evil manner. :)
 

Mr. Underhill

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I also think Boromir was brave and trustworthy. Yes, he was seduced by the power of the Ring, but the Ring was an extremely powerful temptation and he was but a mortal man of limited Numenorean heritage as was mentioned earlier. I believe he redeemed himself in the end by defending Merry and Pippin to the death, thereby revealing his true colors.
 

LadyEowyn

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Originally posted by Mr. Underhill
I also think Boromir was brave and trustworthy. Yes, he was seduced by the power of the Ring, but the Ring was an extremely powerful temptation and he was but a mortal man of limited Numenorean heritage as was mentioned earlier. I believe he redeemed himself in the end by defending Merry and Pippin to the death, thereby revealing his true colors.
I completely agree.

Just to let everyone know, I finished the book...and that was a very sad ending.
 

Grond

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One cannot end a post with "...and that was a very sad ending." and stop there. Please explain why you thought it was sad and from who's perspective. It was, indeed, sad that Frodo had to leave ME and wasn't able to reap some of the rewards he deserved. It was sad to see the end of the Eldar times and the beginning of the dominion of man... but these things were inevitable if the Quest to destroy the Ring was successful.

Please let us know what part sddenned you deeply so that we on the forum may share your sadness.:)

BTW, congratulations on finishing the book. Now............ read it again and study the appendices. There will be a test at 5:00 this Wednesday.:D
 

LadyEowyn

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Originally posted by Grond
One cannot end a post with "...and that was a very sad ending." and stop there. Please explain why you thought it was sad and from who's perspective. It was, indeed, sad that Frodo had to leave ME and wasn't able to reap some of the rewards he deserved. It was sad to see the end of the Eldar times and the beginning of the dominion of man... but these things were inevitable if the Quest to destroy the Ring was successful.

Please let us know what part sddenned you deeply so that we on the forum may share your sadness.:)

BTW, congratulations on finishing the book. Now............ read it again and study the appendices. There will be a test at 5:00 this Wednesday.:D
Haha, sorry about that. I'm not sure why i thought it was sad, otherwise I would have told you guys why. I'm sure it has something to do with them leaving. hmm....
 

Ancalagon

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I posted this response to a thread started many moons ago by Elessar named 'Sorrow'.

I think the death of Boromir was probably the bitterest pill to swallow. A proud man, tormented by the desire to regain the glory of a diminished nation, yet corrupted by the lust for that which might have delivered it. He died, repentent, proud and valiant, yet lived, tormented and disillusioned. Aragorn and Gandalf both knew the anguish and expectations of Denethor. Faramir also bore the curse of the stewardship that drove Boromir to his end. Yet, he did not expect or search out glory, only the simple recognition of a father. This he was always denied, ever in the shadow of his mighty brother. I feel this is a tale of woe, similar to many that Tolkien developed, yet doomed to the same fate as many who had befallen a similar curse upon the Houses of Men long, long before.

Boromir was certainly trustworthy, without doubt he was corrupted as are many mortals by their desire to succeed where all else has failed. The ring gave him new found hope that only a few would have ever truly understood. Sadly, if you know the history of the ring, you will know it's power over even the strongest. Was Isildur to be trusted?
 

Grond

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Damn Anc. That's exactly what I was trying to say. My only exception is that I feel Faramir was resigned to his station. He mya have begrudged it but sought nothing more than what he had.

Over all your quote relates my own feelings, though put forth much more eloquently. (You just won't let me be beaten in the polls.... you have to prove you are a better writer as well).:(
 

Walter

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Grond: I didn't intend to make Boromir look insidious and evil, all I meant was exactly what I said "He couldn't control his urge for power" and that is pretty much the same I read in Your reply...

Boromir was brave and trustworthy too, but only to a point.

And I too have had certain sad feelings when I had finished reading the LotR - happens at times when a book has thrilled me in a way where I felt I had been totally absorbed in the story and all of a sudden feel thrown mercilessly back into reality...
 

Grond

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Originally posted by Walter
So, is it all that noble wanting to save "the own people" and sacrifying the rest of the world for it?

I would also like to throw in that Frodo felt forced to leave the fellowship mainly due to Boromirs attempt to get hold of the ring.
Walter, my issue was not that quote but the two above.

1) In saving Gondor, Boromir would have been saving the rest of the world as it was the most powerful of all the kingdoms of man on ME during the time of the Ring. If it fell, all others would also. I also didn't say he wasn't greedy or desirous of power only not necessarily evil.

2) Frodo left the fellowship because Boromir's actions made him realize that the quest was his alone and that others in the party may also have succumbed to its power. So it was the actions and not the character of Boromir that made Frodo leave.

At least that's how Grond sees it.

BTW, I appreciate your knowledge and enthusiasm Walter and agree with you on most items. My disagreements are not personal and I hope they don't come off that way.:)
 

Tyaronumen

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Originally posted by Grond
I think this behavior illustrates how little Numenorean blood Boromir possessed. It is apparent that Faramir got the Lion's share of the Numenorean blood. It's easy to compare, both had the ring almost in their grasp and one tried to take it by force and yet, the other brother aided it on its way to Mordor.
I actually have a different take on this (surprise, surprise)... Do not forget that many of purer Numenorean lineage than Boromir did far greater evil and were far less noble.

I think specifically of:
Castamir
Ar-anything of Numenor (Adunakhor & Pharazon, are the only two I can consistently recall to memory :D)
Pelendur, father of the first ruling steward of Gondor.

I would say rather that Boromir favoured the pride and arrogance of the later kings of Numenor, while Faramir was a memory of the nobility of the noon-time of Numenor.

(and, you may ask, why do I place Pelendur among such disgraceful company? His actions as regard Arvedui speak clearly enough, IMHO. A man over-proud and un-deserving of his title, IMHO. The fact that it is in Pelendur's reign that the stewardship became hereditary is another clear sign, IMHO).

Having said all that, I truly pity Boromir. As many who try to act against evil, they end up performing an evil act in the name of righteousness. That's doens't make them evil, it just makes them act in an evil manner. :)
I always thought of Boromir as being one-dimensional in that he was a master of arms, and mighty in the ways of war, but he had no understanding when it came to things of a subtler nature (apparently this includes 'women'. :D)
 

Grond

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Ty, are you seeking to make a living in disagreeing with me??? I'm really not evil or bad or ugly (well at least not too ugly) or is it just because I'm an idiot???
 

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