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What music are you listening to at this moment?

Squint-eyed Southerner

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To my notebook's DVD player? I told you elsewhere that I'm a ten-thumber in things Internet! And I shut down my notebook (laptop) every night before I go to bed, never mind that I've removed the "Crossroads" DVD from the player. I did mention both of the Jeff Beck titles in my above post. So going to YouTube sees to be your only viable possibility.
OK, fair enough -- I'll take a look around.

As for your musing on ages, it makes me wonder -- what was I doing at age 12?

Hmm. . .let me think. . .oh, yeah -- not this:

 

Olorgando

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… As for your musing on ages, it makes me wonder -- what was I doing at age 12? ...
Oh dear, memory of things over 50 years ago has gotten fuzzy.
Perhaps, just perhaps, it was the year I saw my first baseball games live.
With some classmates from school (and definitely parents tagging along, though not mine).
It was during the week, and what was then called a "twi-night double-header".
Yep, either game two ended past midnight, or at least it was past midnight before I got home.
My parents were bouncing off the walls and ceilings of our apartment by that time (they never got the hang of baseball, ever).
To edge nearer to topic again, this was in the old Shea Stadium (where in high school times I went alone, old enough by then, to see a Saturday daytime double-header).
The Beatles held one of their last-ever live concerts there on 23 August, 1966 (when my parents and I had just entered the US for their eight-year plus and my nine-year stay).
The last-ever official live concert was at San Francisco's Candlestick Park on 29 August 1966.
Problem at both was that the band would have needed megawatt amplifiers to be able to overcome the concrete-shredding, senseless teenybopper shrieking.
Put an end to their touring - very much to the benefit of their musical development.
 

Squint-eyed Southerner

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No love for Volgalied, Philistines? :mad:

OK, then. Speaking of AGT, here's another Got Talent little one I've been following since her first appearance. She and her voice have both been maturing:


 

Olorgando

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Just listened to a CD of George Benson's 1978 live LP "Weekend in L.A.".
While we were at out city's smallish shopping mall, I browsed through some music CD / DVD stuff and found two five-album CD boxes, one called "Original Album Series", the other "Original Album Classics".
Besides "Weekend in L.A.", the OAS also includes "Breezin'" (1976), "Give Me the Night" (1980), "Tenderly" (1989) and "Big Boss Band" (1990).
OAC has "It's Uptown" (1966), "The George Benson Cookbook" (1967), "Beyond the Blue Horizon" (1971), "Body Talk" (1973) and "Bad Benson" (1974).
Besides five overlaps between my existing George Benson stuff (all LP) I have nine further LPs by Benson.
I think all of the music CD stuff I've bought for ages has been album collections.
A six-CD The Doors box (all the Jim Morrison studio LPs), a five CD Doobie Brothers box (all their really good early albums), a five-CD Jethro Tull box (including, most importantly, one of my favorite LPs of all time, "Aqualung"!), and a three-CD, non-album-based 50 tracks collection of Creedence Clearwater Revival.
I could spend an entire day in nirvana just listening to this stuff! 😍
 
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Squint-eyed Southerner

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1) I can't believe how many elevator music videos there are.

2) I can't believe how many people post comments on elevator music videos.

3) This is my favorite elevator song:

 

Olorgando

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And for this evening's self-pity party:


*Sniff* 😢
No question, as pretty much all operatic singers, an amazing voice.
As a quick aside, Sir Christopher Lee was a trained operatic bass!
But what I find difficult for me about opera that I hardly understand the texts even when the singing is in German or English! 😵

A bit closer to this video in question, for some reason, at least some Germans even shortly after WW II (and continuing to today) were still fond of some things (tsarist) Russian.
Besides the Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington and Herbie Mann LPs of my dad's that I mentioned elsewhere, there was also an LP with Russian songs by The Don Cossack Choir Serge Jaroff (formed by Cossacks having gone into exile after being defeated by the Red Army in the civil war following WW I, by Serge Jaroff in 1921, and conducted by him for almost 60 (!) years).
I still have that old LP of my dad's somewhere, but I also bought a double LP collection of their songs here in Germany somewhere in the 1980s (the LP has no dating given at all).
On the old LP of my dad's there is the "Song of the Volga Boatmen", which I found in the German-language Wikipedia first, but then in the English-language one, too.
Both have and audio of a 1902 record by Feodor Chaliapin (Fjodor Schaljapin in the German Wiki) which even now sends chills down my back.
But the version boomed out by that choir is on quite another level again - major goosebumps territory! 🤩
 

Squint-eyed Southerner

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There are over 100 pieces on youtube by them.
I have a few of the lps issued and reissued and over for decades by the Red Army Choir, but none by the Don Cossacks (that I know of).

My favorite recording of this kind of stuff is actually one done by a very small ensemble, twenty years ago:


25 bucks is outrageous -- it was issued by a super-budget label for $5 in the US. I see several used copies listed there for under $2. Unfortunately, last I looked, nothing on youtube. Unlike most performances of Russian folksongs with huge, in-your-face choirs, this is more intimate, as if you're sitting in a little cafe at midnight, with a couple of empty vodka bottles rolling on the table. I recommend it, if you can find a copy.

Edit: Now this is frustrating -- someone posted the entire CD on youtube, but the only cut not blocked in the US is the one instrumental. Still, you can get an idea of the intimate nature of the recording:


It's possibly not blocked in your country -- try a youtube search for Diman Pantchev, if you're interested.

Second edit: You can try this, though it seems a bit random (I'm not familiar with the ins and outs of Slacker):


Anyway, Russians are just as prone to nostalgia fests as anyone; here's a sample from the big-chorus genre. Get out the hankies (and the insulin):

 
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Olorgando

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I have a few of the lps issued and reissued and over for decades by the Red Army Choir, but none by the Don Cossacks (that I know of).
I vaguely recall a remark in my Wikipedia browsings (G/E) that practically all Cossack choirs are exile affairs.
Apparently many Cossacks were very much tsarists and had no truck with the Bolsheviks
Anyway, Russians are just as prone to nostalgia fests as anyone; here's a sample from the big-chorus genre. Get out the hankies (and the insulin):

Oh help! 😄
In my last 9 active years with the company, I was involved with gas turbine projects in Russia, with our Russian subsidiary and joint ventures with Russian companies.
(The Crimean mess kind of put a damper on that.)
But anyway, we had some intercultural schooling for these projects, including learning a Russian song to perform when at some larger kick-off meeting (which I didn't attend).
And it was exactly Katyusha! (In origin a female name, those rockets came much later.)
Let me put it diplomatically - our "company choir" certainly wouldn't cause any of these choirs sleepless nights. 🤣
 

Olorgando

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I'd be interested in the original music that they all danced to in the episode! :p
Lurch, at his size, was naturally at a disadvantage, not bad for such an "Ent".
(In real life, Ted Cassidy, who played Lurch, 6'9" or 206 cm, was taller than Fred Gwynne, who played Herman Munster of "The Munsters", 6'5" or 196 cm. Gwynne had plateau soles to make him taller. Loved both of those 1960s black-and-white (!) series. 😄 )
 

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