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Why is Aragorn in exile?

O

Orcrist

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Aragorn

I have read the LOTR before but can't remember an important point. I'm rereading right now and am in book five. I can't stand it anymore and need to know the answer to this question: WHY IS ARAGORN IN EXILE?
any help will be greatly appreciated. if the answer is a spoiler please don't tell me.
 

aragil

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Don't let Elrond's line from the movie fool you...

Aragorn wasn't in exile. Through his male ancestors he is the rightful king of Arthedain (part of the former kingdom of Arnor). His kingdom was effectively wiped out ~1300 years prior to LOTR by the witch king of Angmar (lord of the ringwraiths). The surviving nobility from Arthedain (including Aragorn) makes up the Rangers. So when Frodo meets Aragorn in Bree, he is actually in the heart of Aragorn's kingdom.
Aragorn's claim to Gondor comes from ~1300 years ago (right before the fall of Arthedain). One of the daughters of the King of Gondor married the heir to the throne of Arthedain. All of the sons of the King of Gondor were later killed, and Arthedain asserted that it could claim the throne of Gondor. This was refuted by Gondor, who instated the King's nephew (or cousin, I can't remember) in his place. Later on the newphew and all of his sons died as well, but by this time Arthedain had effectively been destroyed, so Aragorn's ancestors weren't able to press their claim.
 
O

Orcrist

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Thanks for the info,
By the way, where does this information come from? appendix A?
I just want to make sure that i'm not missing something.
 

pgt

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Actually I think the better claim is that he is of Isildur and Elendils line as his claim to the throne. I thought this was the same logic made in the Arthedain claim that was rejected at that time by Gondor.

My theory as to why the long wait before (again) claiming the throne was historical 'timing'. Elrond among others probably counselled this. Some dude from the wild can't very well just walk up to the most powerful city in ME and claim to be king especially with another dude (like Denethor) already calling the shots. I bet that claim would have been rejected real quick just like the one 1300 years before!

But when war and doom are looming...
Denethor loses it...
Boromir is dead...
You've got the shards of Narsil and a few other prophet gizmos...
Faramir is dying...
Mithrandir is supporting you...
You ride with 2 rarely seen elvish lords courtesy of Imladris...
The Periannath halflings appear from legend...
You ride with northern Dunedain 'captains'
You call on the host of the dead...
You've already convinced Gondors most powerfull ally you're the king...
You arrive with a fleet...
You save Faramir with "Kings foil" proving the healing hand legend...
...and basically talk the talk and walk the walk... not to mention leading the final military blow that saves everyone temporarily and there is no one else left to lead (Oh and you find another tree though that happened a tad late)...

... well it took 1300 years to get the timing right after the 1st failed claim. Darn lucky too because during the time of the 1st claim they still had a kingdom, power, were established members of the nobility etc. 1300 years later they were largely reduced to wanders shouldering a hefty burden of proof.

Bree 'was' in the kingdom Aragorn would have inherited. There was no kingdom for Aragorn at the time of Bree. In a way he was in exile. Even after he becomes crowned, the North continues to be a dramatically reduced and symbolic kingdom up through the end of the writings I recall.
 

Snaga

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Good post pgt - nothing to add to that.

The other question is why there was no attempt to re-establish the North Kingdom?

My guess is that the Dunedain were no longer strong enough and the Witch King would have come back again and the reason was to spare Eriador from war???
 

Kris Rhodes

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The North Kingdom

I don't know that it was merely a symbolic kingdom in the end. Aragorn seems to have made some pretty strong and binding decrees about, for example, the shire and contact with it from outside. And Aragorn himself travelled in the north as King - which is hard for me to imagine unless the north were safely and certainly *his* kingdom.

-Kris
 

aragil

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Good points about Aragorns' claim to Gondor, but ...

I still don't think that Aragorn was claiming the throne of Gondor through the line of Isildur. When Arvedui of Arthedain pressed his claim to the throne he was married to a woman of the line of Anarion, not descended from it. Gondor responded that following the Last Alliance, Isildur had forsaken the kingship of Gondor in order to govern the North, which at that time was perceived as being the higher calling. Therefore the line of Isildur could not claim the throne of Gondor, but the line of Anarion (which Aragorn was also descended from) could. That being said, I think that the reasons that none of the other descendants of Arvedui pressed their claim are exactly those posted by pgt.
Variag, were you referring to why no effort was made before the Lord of the Rings, or after? If before, then I agree with you- between the Great Plague and the constant warfare with Rhudaur (where's Aerin?) & Angmar, the Numenorean population of Arthedain (and Cardolan) was decimated beyond raising again. The natives of Eriador (Rivermen, Breelanders) were still around, along with the relatively few rangers, so I guess they were what comprised the fourth age Kingdom of Arnor (which was resurrected as per Kris' post).
 

Telcontar

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Are we forgetting the Kin-Strife?

Also, if you remember from the RoTK, are large reason why Arvedui's claim was denied was due to the blood spilled during the Kin-Strife and the desire of the Steward of Gondor at the time (don't remember the name) wishing to prevent any such infighting from recurring. The Crown was given to the the King's cousin, descended from the brother (I think) of a previous King, instead of the King's daughter (Arvedui's wife).
 

aragil

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Doh! This same thread has been argued here before, and last time I brought up the Kin-strife. My mind is beginning to slip at a rather precipitous rate. Oh well, good call Telcontar.

ps 1st Ruling Steward- Mardil, beginning his reign in 2050, 75 years after the fall of Arthedain and 642 years after the beginning of the Kin-strife. (War of the ring was fought in TA 3018-3019)
Pelendur- steward of Ondoher (of Gondor) who played a large role in denying Arvedui the crown.
Firiel- daughter of Ondoher and wife of Arvedui.
Earnil II- King of Gondor subsequent to Ondoher. He was the Great-grandson of Arciryas, who was brother to King Narmacil II of Gondor (everybody got that?).
Earnur- Son of Earnil II, last king of Gondor before Aragorn. Perished in 2050.
 

pgt

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To further my position that Aragorn's cliam was not based on Arvedui be the direct Isiludur/Elendil claim how many time sin the book are we treated to quotes like "Isildur's heir" or 'of the line of Elendil'? Answer: many many times... Not once in the text of the 3 books are we treated to the name "ARvedui" to the best of my memory. That name is only found by digging through obscure appendices AFAIK. That claim was no part of Aragorn's claim. In fact it's best convienently forgotten as it doesn't help his case. It was officially rejected which set an uncomfortable legal precedent for Aragorn to overcome. It was overcome by conveniently forgetting it and going straight to the original Isildur/Elendil claim (along w/ all the timing I mentioned earlier).

It DUPLICATES the merits of the Arvedui claim. It is NOT BASED UPON the Arvedui claim.

The Arvedui claim is a FAILED claim. How and why would you base a claim on a non-claim or rejected claim.

That's like telling the judge you were speeding because the guy in front of me was speeding even though the guy in front of you got busted for it. Better to say what the guy in front of you was saying - that his speedo was broke. Only your car is about a 1000 years older than the guy in front and maybe this time the judge will buy it!

---

I agree, the Arnorians or Arnorites or whatever were essentially treated to genocide from what the books say. But my problem with that is why was Bree (in the heart of the kingdom) spared as well as the Shire that we KNOW was spared). The Shire was explicitly involved in the defense of Arnor by sending a company of archers that never returned. I suppose the actual physical conflict proper never quite reached the Shire per se. And Bree's history is sufficiently vague that anything can be invented. But all in all that's pretty dang precise and specific genocide much too close to other potential targets like Bree and Shire.
 
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aragil

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Aragorn didn't claim kingship through Arvedui...

He claimed it through descent from Anarion via Firiel. Arvedui tried the ol' descent from Elendil/Isildur, and Gondor specifically rejected that claim because Isildur himself had given up lordship over the southern kingdom. From that point on, only a descendant of Anarion could rule Gondor. Aragorn was descended from Anarion, therefore he had a claim. Arvedui was not, therefore he didn't.

The Shire, Bree, and the rest of Eriador was spared because Earnur (son of the king of Gondor at the time of the fall of Arthedain) arrived with a huge expeditionary fleet from Gondor. He wiped out the realm of Angmar, thus making the North safe for a while. Unfortunately there just weren't enough Dunedain left in the North to take advantage of that fact.
 

pgt

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Firiel? Huh?

"'At Pelargir the HEIR OF ISILDUR will have need of you" - Aragorn addressing Angbor.

"'Hear now the words of the HEIR OF ISULDUR'" - Aragorn addressing host of the dead

There are others I'm sure...

But the definitive quote I believe is:

"Here is Aragorn, ... ... ... ... Elessar [Aragorn] of the line of Valandil, ISILDUR's SON, Elendil's son of Numenor. Shall he be king and enter into the City and dwell there?'" - Steward Faramir officially addressing the powers that be.

You of course know the answer to Faramir's retorical question. Faramir is the decider in this matter and Faramir doesn't justify his decision thorugh Anarion or Firiel. Read the full account for yourself in RotK.

It all had to do with timing (as I posted above) as the most important part of the claim and the oficial Isildur lineage claim had almost become a minor detail at the point in most Gondorian's mines IMHO.

Oh, EXCELLENT Eriador/SHire/Bree explanation - I completely forgot about the interceding that occured - makes perfect sense! Thanks!
 
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HalasĂ­an

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I have read the LOTR before but can't remember an important point. I'm rereading right now and am in book five. I can't stand it anymore and need to know the answer to this question: WHY IS ARAGORN IN EXILE?
I guess this is the type of questions that come up when people read the books after the movie? I was asked this a few times now...
 

Gigantor

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Aragorn

I have read the LOTR before but can't remember an important point. I'm rereading right now and am in book five. I can't stand it anymore and need to know the answer to this question: WHY IS ARAGORN IN EXILE?
any help will be greatly appreciated. if the answer is a spoiler please don't tell me.
Aragorn's in exile so Sauron doesn't find out and rek his dreams of being King of Gondor (which would have Sauron gettin' rek'd along the way).
 

Might_of_arnor

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He is not, rather Elrond made it appear so that sauron would not find a member of isildurs bloodline was still alive.

Remember aragorns blood stems back to the numenorians in which aragorn holds many of the ancient traits his ancestors had (dark hair, grey eyes, he was said to be 6'6 as was the average height of a numenorian, had a long lasting life which if I clearly remember aragorn lived to at least 210 years and just had a better resistance to the elements than most men would have)

Not to mention he comes from the people who eru let live and thus that good will in aragorn still resides within him. However I believe he puts himself in exile more than Elrond has done so, more for because he does not want to become isildur himself (who failed to cast the one ring and end the greatest evil middle earth had seen). This fear of failing his bloodline is what stops aragorn from wanting to take his rightful place as King of men and his faith in men also lacks (in the movies, in the extended scene where they land on amon hen, Boromir pulls aragorn aside and says somewhere along the lines "you cannot forever escape your fate as King, come and let us go to gondor where we will fight mordor together" aragorn does not respond but you can tell he is reluctant, Boromir proceedes with "you put more faith in elves and dwarves more than your own kin" this is goes back to isildur.
 

CirdanLinweilin

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He is not, rather Elrond made it appear so that sauron would not find a member of isildurs bloodline was still alive.

Remember aragorns blood stems back to the numenorians in which aragorn holds many of the ancient traits his ancestors had (dark hair, grey eyes, he was said to be 6'6 as was the average height of a numenorian, had a long lasting life which if I clearly remember aragorn lived to at least 210 years and just had a better resistance to the elements than most men would have)

Not to mention he comes from the people who eru let live and thus that good will in aragorn still resides within him. However I believe he puts himself in exile more than Elrond has done so, more for because he does not want to become isildur himself (who failed to cast the one ring and end the greatest evil middle earth had seen). This fear of failing his bloodline is what stops aragorn from wanting to take his rightful place as King of men and his faith in men also lacks (in the movies, in the extended scene where they land on amon hen, Boromir pulls aragorn aside and says somewhere along the lines "you cannot forever escape your fate as King, come and let us go to gondor where we will fight mordor together" aragorn does not respond but you can tell he is reluctant, Boromir proceedes with "you put more faith in elves and dwarves more than your own kin" this is goes back to isildur.
Good post. However,

The whole "Reluctant King" side of Aragorn is entirely Peter Jackson's meddling. Aragorn always desired to be King, he knew he'd be King, it was his sole right. He was just waiting for the right time, this sort of thing is actually quite common in Medieval literature. As a post above us puts it: "Historical Timing". I don't mean to attack your post, I just don't want anyone getting confused by the movies.

Aragorn wasn't some emasculated exile, he was the Future King of the Reunited Kingdom. Him having Narsil reforged into AndĂşril at the start of the journey is proof of that.

Other than that, good post! :)

CL
 

Hador

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I believe he puts himself in exile more than Elrond has done so, more for because he does not want to become isildur himself (who failed to cast the one ring and end the greatest evil middle earth had seen). This fear of failing his bloodline is what stops aragorn from wanting to take his rightful place as King of men and his faith in men also lacks
I'd say that Aragorn and the 14 Chieftans before him were not kings because "their power departed" (The North-kingdom and the Dunedain) after the fall of Arthedain to Angmar. Aragorn's ancestor, the last king of Arthedain (Arvedui) attempted to get the crown of Gondor, but he failed in this because he was not of the line of Meneldil and the Northern kings were seen as weak.

To most men in Gondor, the realm in Arthedain seemed a small thing, for all the lineage of its lords. (Gondor and the Heirs of Anarion)
That is why Eärnil, a great captain of Gondor, who was the 3rd cousin of King Ondoher (who died with his sons) was chosen. Although Pelendur may have also been persuaded by the promise of a hereditary stewardship. Eärnil was a proven and victorious captain, strong, worthy through his might of arms and bloodline.

Aragorn was working his way to reclaim the kingship throughout his life. His uncle Elrond said to him;

She shall not be the bride of any Man less than the King of Gondor and Arnor. (Of Aragorn and Arwen)
There was no reluctance on Aragorn's part to attain his rightful inheritance. In Rivendell Boromir is hopeful that Aragorn is more than a name:

Mayhap the Sword-that-was-Broken may still stem the tide - if the hand that wields it has inherited not an heirloom only, but the sinews of the Kings of Men. (The Council of Elrond)
And then Aragorn tells him, "we will put it to the test one day."

He was going to head to Gondor with Boromir. When Elendil's sword was reforged in Rivendell it is said why this was done.

For Aragorn son of Arathorn was going to war upon the Marches of Mordor. (The Ring Goes South)
Aragorn in his life proved himself over and over again (The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen). He became renowned in Gondor as Thorongil, "He came to Ecthelion from Rohan, where he had served the King Thengel." (The Stewards)

2957-80 Aragorn undertakes his great journies and errantries. He serves in disguise both Thengel of Rohan and Ecthelion ll of Gondor. (The Tale of Years, The Third Age)
Later during the War of the Ring he proved himself again. These acts of valour and success by Aragorn were the means for his reclamation of the throne. Perhaps if an earlier ancestor proved himself in like manner it would have been done earlier. As we saw with Arvedui the Northern DĂşnedain were not held in high regard. Denethor, over a thousand years after Arvedui, still saw the line of Isildur as a "a ragged house long bereft of dignity" (The Pyre of Denethor).

There is a gradual coming into his own that appears in the books. It begins in the tavern where he did not glitter, to the healing hands being the hands of a King as declared by the DĂşnadan woman Ioreth in Minas Tirith.

Aragorn took the stone and pinned the brooch upon his breast, and those who saw him wondered; for they had not marked before how tall and kingly he stood. (The Mirror of Galadriel)
There is an instance in Rohan where Aragorn asserts his authority in a kingly manner. He declares to the Rohirrim:

It is not clear to me that the will of Théoden son of Thengel, even though he be lord of the Mark, should prevail over the will of Aragorn son of Arathorn, Elendil’s heir of Gondor… I command you not to touch it, nor to permit any other to lay hand on it. In this elvish sheath dwells the Blade that was Broken and has been made again. Telchar first wrought it in the deeps of time. Death shall come to any man that draws Elendil’s sword save Elendil’s heir.(The King of the Golden Hall)
This is a clear indication of his station and bloodline.

There is Éowyn's perception of Aragorn;

she now was suddenly aware of him: tall heir of kings, wise with many winters, greycloaked, hiding a power that yet she felt. (The King of the Golden Hall)
There is also this bit of lore from Gondor from Ioreth (mentioned earlier) about the kings and their healing prowess:

would that there were kings in Gondor, as there were once upon a time, they say! For it is said in old lore: The hands of the king are the hands of a healer. And so the rightful king could ever be known. (The Houses of Healing)
This is an ability shown by Aragorn very early on in the story. When he and the hobbits encountered the Nazgûl Aragorn demonstrates this when he breathes some life back into Frodo after he had received a Morgul-wound in Flight to the Ford. However, no one could really cure Frodo of the wound which remained with him even as he left Middle-earth. Aragorn, Glorfindel, and Elrond had taken a look at it and did what they could. He healed Gimli (The Road to Isengard). Then in Gondor he took care of Faramir, Merry, and Éowyn, doing which, word spread like wildfire about the king and how "after war he brought healing" (The Houses of Healing). Aragorn says, "I have, maybe, the power to heal her body, and to recall her from the dark valley." (The Houses of Healing) when dealing with Éowyn.

The one other thing is his taking up of the seeing-stone and revealing himself to Sauron. The palantĂ­r were in the power of the kings and as king he battled against Sauron, "I am the lawful master of the Stone, and I had both the right and the strength to use it, or so I judged. The right cannot be doubted. The strength was enough, barely" (The Passing of the Grey Company). This is another act of Aragorn being kingly by using the Stone which is his by law and right. Below is the scene in which he made use of it.

"'Where is Aragorn?'
'In a high chamber of the Burg,' said Legolas. 'He has neither rested nor slept, I think. He went thither some hours ago, saying he must take thought, and only his kinsman, Halbarad, went with him;'
<...>
Merry had eyes only for Aragorn, so startling was the change that he saw in him, as if in one night many years had fallen on his head. Grim was his face, grey-hued and weary.
'I am troubled in mind, lord,' he said, standing by the king's horse.
'I have heard strange words, and I see new perils far off. I have laboured long in thought, and now I fear that I must change my purpose.'
<...>
'A struggle grimmer for my part than the battle of the Hornburg,' answered Aragorn. 'I have looked in the Stone of Orthanc, my friends.'" (The Passing of the Grey Company)
There is also the instance of Aragorn unfurling the banner of his house (Elendil) just before he and his men engaged in the battle of the Pelennor Fields.

There flowered a White Tree, and that was for Gondor; but Seven Stars were about it, and a high crown above it, the signs of Elendil that no lord had borne for years beyond count.(Battle of the Pelennor Fields)
Aragorn is seen revealing himself to his enemies, while he does also hide from him. He told the Hobbits how the Enemy is setting traps for him. Yet at Helm's Deep he showed himself and the Enemy did a double take and were taken aback.
 
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CirdanLinweilin

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I'd say that Aragorn and the 14 Chieftans before him were not kings because "their power departed" (The North-kingdom and the Dunedain) after the fall of Arthedain to Angmar. Aragorn's ancestor, the last king of Arthedain (Arvedui) attempted to get the crown of Gondor, but he failed in this because he was not of the line of Meneldil and the Northern kings were seen as weak.



That is why Eärnil, a great captain of Gondor, who was the 3rd cousin of King Ondoher (who died with his sons) was chosen. Although Pelendur may have also been persuaded by the promise of a hereditary stewardship. Eärnil was a proven and victorious captain, strong, worthy through his might of arms and bloodline.

Aragorn was working his way to reclaim the kingship throughout his life. His uncle Elrond said to him;



There was no reluctance on Aragorn's part to attain his rightful inheritance. In Rivendell Boromir is hopeful that Aragorn is more than a name:



And then Aragorn tells him, "we will put it to the test one day."

He was going to head to Gondor with Boromir. When Elendil's sword was reforged in Rivendell it is said why this was done.



Aragorn in his life proved himself over and over again (The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen). He became renowned in Gondor as Thorongil, "He came to Ecthelion from Rohan, where he had served the King Thengel." (The Stewards)



Later during the War of the Ring he proved himself again. These acts of valour and success by Aragorn were the means for his reclamation of the throne. Perhaps if an earlier ancestor proved himself in like manner it would have been done earlier. As we saw with Arvedui the Northern DĂşnedain were not held in high regard. Denethor, over a thousand years after Arvedui, still saw the line of Isildur as a "a ragged house long bereft of dignity" (The Pyre of Denethor).

There is a gradual coming into his own that appears in the books. It begins in the tavern where he did not glitter, to the healing hands being the hands of a King as declared by the DĂşnadan woman Ioreth in Minas Tirith.



There is an instance in Rohan where Aragorn asserts his authority in a kingly manner. He declares to the Rohirrim:



This is a clear indication of his station and bloodline.

There is Éowyn's perception of Aragorn;



There is also this bit of lore from Gondor from Ioreth (mentioned earlier) about the kings and their healing prowess:



This is an ability shown by Aragorn very early on in the story. When he and the hobbits encountered the Nazgûl Aragorn demonstrates this when he breathes some life back into Frodo after he had received a Morgul-wound in Flight to the Ford. However, no one could really cure Frodo of the wound which remained with him even as he left Middle-earth. Aragorn, Glorfindel, and Elrond had taken a look at it and did what they could. He healed Gimli (The Road to Isengard). Then in Gondor he took care of Faramir, Merry, and Éowyn, doing which, word spread like wildfire about the king and how "after war he brought healing" (The Houses of Healing). Aragorn says, "I have, maybe, the power to heal her body, and to recall her from the dark valley." (The Houses of Healing) when dealing with Éowyn.

The one other thing is his taking up of the seeing-stone and revealing himself to Sauron. The palantĂ­r were in the power of the kings and as king he battled against Sauron, "I am the lawful master of the Stone, and I had both the right and the strength to use it, or so I judged. The right cannot be doubted. The strength was enough, barely" (The Passing of the Grey Company). This is another act of Aragorn being kingly by using the Stone which is his by law and right. Below is the scene in which he made use of it.



There is also the instance of Aragorn unfurling the banner of his house (Elendil) just before he and his men engaged in the battle of the Pelennor Fields.



Aragorn is seen revealing himself to his enemies, while he does also hide from him. He told the Hobbits how the Enemy is setting traps for him. Yet at Helm's Deep he showed himself and the Enemy did a double take and were taken aback.
Bravo! Excellent post mellon!

CL
 

HalasĂ­an

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I'd say that Aragorn and the 14 Chieftans before him were not kings because "their power departed" (The North-kingdom and the Dunedain) after the fall of Arthedain to Angmar. Aragorn's ancestor, the last king of Arthedain (Arvedui) attempted to get the crown of Gondor, but he failed in this because he was not of the line of Meneldil and the Northern kings were seen as weak.



That is why Eärnil, a great captain of Gondor, who was the 3rd cousin of King Ondoher (who died with his sons) was chosen. Although Pelendur may have also been persuaded by the promise of a hereditary stewardship. Eärnil was a proven and victorious captain, strong, worthy through his might of arms and bloodline.

Aragorn was working his way to reclaim the kingship throughout his life. His uncle Elrond said to him;



There was no reluctance on Aragorn's part to attain his rightful inheritance. In Rivendell Boromir is hopeful that Aragorn is more than a name:



And then Aragorn tells him, "we will put it to the test one day."

He was going to head to Gondor with Boromir. When Elendil's sword was reforged in Rivendell it is said why this was done.



Aragorn in his life proved himself over and over again (The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen). He became renowned in Gondor as Thorongil, "He came to Ecthelion from Rohan, where he had served the King Thengel." (The Stewards)



Later during the War of the Ring he proved himself again. These acts of valour and success by Aragorn were the means for his reclamation of the throne. Perhaps if an earlier ancestor proved himself in like manner it would have been done earlier. As we saw with Arvedui the Northern DĂşnedain were not held in high regard. Denethor, over a thousand years after Arvedui, still saw the line of Isildur as a "a ragged house long bereft of dignity" (The Pyre of Denethor).

There is a gradual coming into his own that appears in the books. It begins in the tavern where he did not glitter, to the healing hands being the hands of a King as declared by the DĂşnadan woman Ioreth in Minas Tirith.



There is an instance in Rohan where Aragorn asserts his authority in a kingly manner. He declares to the Rohirrim:



This is a clear indication of his station and bloodline.

There is Éowyn's perception of Aragorn;



There is also this bit of lore from Gondor from Ioreth (mentioned earlier) about the kings and their healing prowess:



This is an ability shown by Aragorn very early on in the story. When he and the hobbits encountered the Nazgûl Aragorn demonstrates this when he breathes some life back into Frodo after he had received a Morgul-wound in Flight to the Ford. However, no one could really cure Frodo of the wound which remained with him even as he left Middle-earth. Aragorn, Glorfindel, and Elrond had taken a look at it and did what they could. He healed Gimli (The Road to Isengard). Then in Gondor he took care of Faramir, Merry, and Éowyn, doing which, word spread like wildfire about the king and how "after war he brought healing" (The Houses of Healing). Aragorn says, "I have, maybe, the power to heal her body, and to recall her from the dark valley." (The Houses of Healing) when dealing with Éowyn.

The one other thing is his taking up of the seeing-stone and revealing himself to Sauron. The palantĂ­r were in the power of the kings and as king he battled against Sauron, "I am the lawful master of the Stone, and I had both the right and the strength to use it, or so I judged. The right cannot be doubted. The strength was enough, barely" (The Passing of the Grey Company). This is another act of Aragorn being kingly by using the Stone which is his by law and right. Below is the scene in which he made use of it.



There is also the instance of Aragorn unfurling the banner of his house (Elendil) just before he and his men engaged in the battle of the Pelennor Fields.



Aragorn is seen revealing himself to his enemies, while he does also hide from him. He told the Hobbits how the Enemy is setting traps for him. Yet at Helm's Deep he showed himself and the Enemy did a double take and were taken aback.

Yes! It's good to see some book knowledge! Thanks for your excellent post Hador!

The whole stripping of the northern kingdom of Arnor from the PJ screenplay really shtz me to tears. It was all done in both laziness and the desire to co-opt the true story by PJ Boyens & co. For those who say they had to make changes to make it fit into a theatrical release and make sense to those who didn't read the books, there is a simple way to write in the north. You introduce the Dunedain Rangers in a scene of them opposing the ringwraiths at Sarn Ford, and maybe have a short scene of Halbarad talking to Strider at the Prancing Pony before the hobbits show up. Later, have the Rangers with the Sons of Elrond... and maybe even include Arwen who personally brings the standard she made to him, and have Aragorn be pronounced the heir of Isildur when he wrestles with Sauron via the Palantir (another aspect that was totally missed in the movies). Small changes in the screenplay could have had the story more-or-less right and not introduced the whole 'weak Aragorn' who "chose exile" over rule (never really explained in the movies). It is why I hope this PJ mob has nothing to do with this Amazon Middle Earth series in development.
 

Olorgando

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Aragorn was (and I’ve counted this!) the 64th ruling descendant from his something-or-other great-uncle Elrond’s (twin) brother Elros. The “only” male-descent break occurred when Elros’s great-great-granddaughter Silmarien, (oldest child of Tar-Elendil, fourth king of Númenor) had to cede the throne to her younger brother (and youngest sibling), who took the name of Tar-Meneldur (a line of succession which was soon to be changed, as Tar-Meneldur’s son was Tar-Aldarion, father of the first Ruling Queen Tar-Ancalimë (the latter’s only child for well-known reasons)). After that, the lineage was unbroken male succession for almost 3000 years of the Second Age, and, more to the point, the entire Third Age. Yes, Arnor had fallen apart into three (warring) “kingdoms” after 861 Third Age, and the line of kings had come to an end in 1975 Third Age with the death of Arvedui. But the direct male line of succession of Gondor had been broken several times by then (and Gondor seemed to take a different line on the succession issue that Númenor had after Aldarion), and actually came to a definitive end with the death (presumed) of Eärnur (arriving in the north with a fleet too late to save Arvedui, but at least putting an end to the kingdom of Angmar) in 2050 Third Age, Ruling Stewards taking over after him. By Gondorian juridical standards, Aragorn had an irrefutable claim (but then Stewards can be stubborn about stepping aside …)
 

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