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Your favorite character of Tolkien's works

elladan

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So if you had to choose, what Tolkien character did you admire the most? When I think through that question a lot of names go through my head, elves, men, hobbits etc... Fingolfin, Beren, Luthien, Aragorn, Frodo, Sam, Gandalf, Faramir, and a million more. But in the end the choice would be pretty easy.

Of all the characters that Tolkien wrote about, there is one who in my mind who stands out above the others. That is Finrod Felagund. Like pretty much all of the Noldor, he has the positive traits of being extremely wise, strong, and brave, possessing even the power to be a worthy opponent of Sauron as is shown near the end of his life. But more than that, he has all of those positive traits while still avoiding the trap that so many of the high elves (and others) fell into. That is being so well aware of their positive traits that they became conceited, believing that they are above all others. Examples are all over the place- Feanor, Celegorm, Curufin, even Thingol (not one of the Noldor of course, but still an applicable example). But instead of being like that, Felagund immediately chose to befriend men, and help enlighten them. He is willing to allow his own people of Nargothrond to turn against him, so he can help Beren achieve his end and fulfill his oath to Barahir. And eventually he dies to save Beren. In my opinion with his pure selflessness he comes as close as any character, with the obvious exception of Lluvatar to embodying everything that is good in Tolkien's work.
 

Starbrow

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I've been in love with Aragorn ever since I first read the books in high school many, many years ago. Finrod is a worthy character, but I never really identified with him.
 

morgoth145

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i think i would have to go with Gandalf, his wisdom is unmatched and he is willing to help everyone for the greater good, even if that means he has to fight untill the death. he is also a very kind and humble character, filled with joy to those who know him well. i think my second choice would be fingolfin, he was a mighty elf lord who dared to face morgoth on his own, an elf versus a vala. makes you wonder what happened to the elves in the third age, why arent they powerful anymore!
 

elladan

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wow, this is a tough one! i gotta say, im pretty partial to faramir. his patience and wisdom are a heartwarming reminder of the lost numenor.
Yes, Faramir is definitely my second favorite character, for the reasons you mentioned. I've always thought that with his wisdom, knowledge, and way of looking at the world he was much more like the elf than any of the other men presented in the trilogy. He actually reminds me quite a bit of Finrod now that I think of it this way.

I think Faramir (and I definitely mean book Faramir here) is the ultimate "role model" character in Lord of the Rings. He is never greedy, and always gentle, merciful, courageous (both morally and in battle), and pure-hearted almost to a fault. He is exactly the kind of person that we all should strive to be in the real world. It is very tough to make such a character believable, but Tolkien did a marvelous job. Didn't Tolkien say that Faramir was the one character in Lord of the Rings that he was most like in real life?

Morgoth, I greatly respect Gandalf as you do (although those are surprising words coming from Morgoth, I wouldn't think he would like Gandalf very much:*D), as the single greatest instrument in defeating Sauron, Frodo and Sam excepted. But I do have a difficult time relating to a Maia, which are essentially angelic spirits. He is a wonderful character but he has always seemed kind of "distant" to me if you know what I'm saying.
 
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Bard the Bowman

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It's easy to go with Lord of the Rings characters, because their characters are described in detail and it becomes very personal. Aragorn is the sh**. Glorfindel is my favorite though.
 

Black Captain

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Hmm, tough question. I guess I'd have to go with the Black Sword. I mean sure, he made some mistakes in his time, heck we all do. But in the end, he killed Glaurung (spelling?) and generally just rocked the house.
 

Ruby Gamgee

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Even though the big archer of Dale, Bard, thinks no good things about him :*D , my choice is Aragorn, as Starbrow said, I made him my favorite as soon as I read FotR. But for a while I was choosing between him and Gandalf. I don't know what else to say because everyone knows them :-D :-D
 

Turgon

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Frodo Baggins.

Something that always passed me by in LoTR was Frodo's strength in carrying the burden of the Ring to Mordor. But after carrying a similar burden myself for 11 years, I came to understand the sheer strength it requires. The loss of self is the worse thing that can happen to a sentient being - it's worse than death - yet Frodo dealt with it admirably. And knowing that the only way you can be free is the destruction of the thing you love the most? That will break your heart... trust me on this. Frodo bears no blame in what happened at the Cracks of Doom. Bizarrely Tolkien is always called out by critics for being a light-weight when it comes to the human condition. This is wrong. Tolkien's portrayal of Frodo's burden is nothing but truth and psychological insight. If more critics lived rather than talked... they might understand this.

Hehe! Actually I take all that back... I thought this was the 'True Hero of LoTR' thread - and Frodo is way too dull to be one of my favourite characters. Must be all that moaning he does about his 'burden'.

Anyway... my real answer is!

Tuor, Ulmo, Bilbo, Balin, Smaug, Imrahil and Aragorn...^^
 
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Sulimo

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My favorite character changes every time I read the books. It has historically been Finrod. However, over time I got to say now it is a four way time with the four hobbits being my favorites.
 

richsabre

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gandalf- always has been, probably always will be......now you may say that is a pretty obvious, impersonal choice being one of the mains -however, ever since his first appearance in an unexpected party, i warmed to his character, wise and gentle, but with a flaming power underneath
i mean he can go from giving frodo some mind blowing piece of advice, to being a terrifying beast of a wizard
 

Mouth_Of_Sauron

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Morgoth, I greatly respect Gandalf as you do (although those are surprising words coming from Morgoth, I wouldn't think he would like Gandalf very much:*D), as the single greatest instrument in defeating Sauron, Frodo and Sam excepted. But I do have a difficult time relating to a Maia, which are essentially angelic spirits. He is a wonderful character but he has always seemed kind of "distant" to me if you know what I'm saying.
Gandalf was certainly distant to all races under Eru, but it should be no surprise he took such a liking to the Hobbits and they to him. Gandalf, though alien to all of the speaking races of Arda, was the most personable, so it makes sense (to me anyway) that he would carve a friendship with the most personable peoples of Middle-Earth. Gandalf was Istari, make no mistake, and held his office in the utmost of gravity which garnered the due respect of the Elves. but his playful and humorous side made him a friend of Men and Hobbits (whom, despite their brief life-spans, seem to be the most hearted and less-serious than the Elves in the later days of Men). Dwarves, being distrustful of all things magical, philosophical and not already "set in stone" (terrible pun definitely intended) had trouble relating to any of the Five, but Gandalf was undoubtably the least distant of his order. this is, of course, in direct contrast to Saruman who's fierceness, stern disposition, and grim attitude would almost certainly command the allegiance of servile Orcs.

not debating your point, elladan, just gave me an opportunity to expand on another :*)
 

Erestor Arcamen

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I would have to say that Beleg Cúthalion is one of my most favorite. Laer Cú Beleg hits me every time:

Laer Cú Beleg:Alas! Great Bow! That once in woods and fields was terror of the orcs, and steadfast, strong; against the armies dark a bitter shield that in his life could ne’er commit a wrong. But lost he is, and lost I’ll ever be, for he is gone now, never more to trod this barren earth. And I shall never see his faithful face, but bend beneath Doom’s rod. And Belthronding, his faithful bow of yew, That ne’er was wielded by a mightier hand, that noble deeds would never cease to do: in him was all the greatness of that land. O Beleg! Beleg! Wilt thou not return? The love thou gave me I have never earned.


In you was all the good in me. You knew all things about me, and your faithful heart asked never for return; and always true, even in death, as we are rent apart.


Forgive me now, my brother! Please forgive the one who never did deserve your love. My own life I would give you now to live, if only I could. Naught that rules above could make exchange of one life for anoth’r. Thou dwellest now in Mandos’ shadowed halls, Where I would come for thee, my dearest broth’r. But I dwell now enchained, as one of thralls. O Beleg! Beleg! Brother of my heart! What life is left in me, when we’re apart?


‘Neath Doriath’s boughs we dwelt in all my years of childhood and of growing as a boy. He was my hero, through my grief and tears I wanted to be like him. He brought joy to me in years of sorrow. I saw him as idol, friend, and captain, and his face beheld I with delight, a light in grim sad days, when darkness was my dwelling place. The greatest woodsman in all Middle-earth, the truest friend of any that has lived, the kindest spirit of the dark sea’s berth, most gen’rous heart that any one could give.


O Beleg! Now my greatest friend hath fled, I walk this dark earth as one of the dead.
 

Nesia

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It's difficult to pick only one. There are lot of characters from The Silmarillion which I really, really love. But if I must choose one, my answer is...

Frodo Baggins. He was just a hobbit, he didn't have physical attributes, he couldn't even fight well but he had his strong will. And his mercy. His wisdom. His bravery. His courage. His sacrifice for all people of Middle Earth. And his love for everyone, not for only those, who were nice to him.
Frodo inspire me to not give up and to give everyone a chance to be a good man.

Faramir, Turin and Fingolfin are on the second place :)
 
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Meisiluosi

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Bilbo and Balin in The Hobbit, Legolas, Gimli, Elrond, Treebeard and Faramir in LotR, Fëanorians (well, most of them) in The Silmarillion.
Overall, Fëanorians and Elrond take the cake.
I also have a huge soft spot for 1st Age Easterlings but that's mostly just headcanon/fan theories/fanfic all over the place and I guess it has more to do with my love for Central, Inner and East Asian cultures than with whatever is made known about them in the published texts. (Though Bór most likely WAS an admirable chap, if his and his sons' conduct in Nirnaeth is any indication...)
 
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